Apply

School of Arts & Sciences Undergraduate Programs

Undergraduate Programs

School of Arts & Sciences

Unlock your full potential in both your career and personal life with the School of Arts & Science at Clark Atlanta University.

The School of Arts and Sciences at Clark Atlanta University presents a varied and comprehensive curriculum that empowers students to thrive, discover their direction, and attain a successful professional life. This School forms the fundamental educational base of the university, anchored in a tradition of liberal arts that traces back to Clark College, established in 1869. Clark College was one of the earliest private four-year liberal arts colleges for African Americans in the United States, and it remains a significant pillar of the university’s undergraduate programs.

Degree Program Requirements

Humanities

Arts Program

The Department of Art promotes the creative development of students whose interests and talents lead them toward careers in the visual arts, fashion design, and fashion merchandising while contributing to the cultural enrichment of the University community. 

The Department sponsors visiting artists, designers, and industry professionals.

Mission Statement

Building on the legacy of Hale Woodruff; the mission of the Department of Art is to educate and prepare students as creative artists, fashion designers, and industry merchandising professionals for entrance into visual communications, liberal arts, and various cultural industries.   Our diverse community of faculty and students value inclusivity bringing commitment to exploring the study of art and design as it relates to historical context, social engagement, cultural diversity, and innovation for the benefit of society.

Vision Statement

The Department of Art will be acknowledged as a leader in pioneering innovative, culturally socially aware graduates dedicated to transforming society through the use of independent thinking, visual communications, history of cultures, research, merchandising, and fashion design. 

Academic Programs

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art with General Studio Concentration curricula is designed to encourage intellectual development and growth as well as to develop marketable skills of students interested in preparing for work in art and arts related management and education options. Graduates of this program will have the content knowledge to pursue advanced graduate level study in painting, sculpture, printmaking, and photography or teaching K-12.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art with Advertising Design Concentration curricula is to prepare students intending to enter art industry to pursue careers in a wide array of visual communications areas including advertising art direction, design and illustration for digital and print products, web design, graphic design, photography, and studio production.

The minor in Art provides non-majors with the opportunity to explore artistic media, techniques and basic art concepts. Coursework can include aspects of art appreciation, aesthetics, art history and studio experience.

ENVISIONING A BETTER ART WORLD. Future curators, art historians, museum professionals and artists all come together at the Atlanta University Center Art History + Curatorial Studies Collective. Housed within the Department of Art and Visual Culture at Spelman College, this innovative program aims to shape the future of the art world and position the Atlanta University Center as the leading incubator of African American professionals in these fields. We are cultivating students who will seek knowledge, discover purpose and make change. We welcome students from Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, and Spelman College who desire degrees art history and curatorial studies can find more information about the AUC Art Collective and how to declare HERE.

Made possible by generous support from the Alice L. Walton Foundation, undergraduate students enrolled in this program are also eligible for scholarships and paid summer internship opportunities.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Fashion with Fashion Design Concentration focuses on training students to develop apparel for various markets in keeping with creative, technical, and economic factors of the fashion world as well as emphasizes on the creative aspects of designing and developing merchandise for manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers. The program prepares students for entering the apparel industry as apparel designers, costume designers for theatre, assistant fashion stylists/wardrobes, fashion coordinators, production managers, product developers, computer-aided design specialists, merchandisers, findings/trimming buyers, fabric buyers, showroom sales representatives and entrepreneurs.

Clark Atlanta University was ranked #7 in “Top 10 Fashion Design Schools in the South” 2019 ranking by fashion-schools.org. The ranking can be viewed here.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Fashion with Merchandising Concentration prepares students through structured learning processes to understand industry innovations, challenging careers, current trends, and the impact of globalization, technological advances and the expansion of designers into new and broader categories. The merchandising concentration covers both the retailers and manufacturers needs for merchandisers and product developers. Merchandising reflects the planning, organizational, and sales aspects of the fashion business. Students learn how to merchandise apparel products and how to develop planning modules. They will understand target markets and how to develop promotional plans for various products and events to meet the goals of a successful business. The opportunities for employment are varied and depend upon the student’s interests and abilities. Careers are available in retailing as buyer, planner, manager, fashion coordinator, market researcher; in promotion ad display coordinator, public relations director, advertising manager; in wholesaling as manufacturing representative, showroom sales associate, and in apparel and textile manufacturing as sales associate, piece goods buyer, merchandising manager, market research; in publications as Fashion Stylist, advertising manager, fashion editor.

Clark Atlanta University was ranked #18 in “Top 20 Private Fashion Merchandising Schools” 2019 ranking by fashion-schools.org. The ranking can be viewed here

The minor in Fashion Design provides students with the opportunity to explore artistic media, techniques and basic art concepts. Coursework can include aspects of computer imaging, history of costume, construction and studio experience.

The minor in Merchandising provides students with the opportunity to explore concepts and professional practices related to the retail industry. Coursework includes aspects of merchandising, promotions, and retail management.

CART 101: Art Foundations I. 3 credits

Studio problems in basic design explore the elements and principles of applied design theory.


CART 102: Art Foundations II. 3 credits

Studio problems that cover the properties and effects of light and color. Exploration of basic color organizations and principles.


CART 150: Art Appreciation. 3 credits

Designed to provide students understanding and appreciation of the art forms in the world. Lectures, discussions and visual aids are utilized to survey the painting, sculpture, architecture and other forms of art from different cultures.


CART 201: Drawing I. 3 credits

Introduction to perceptual drawing skills. Focus is on the translation of three dimensional forms to a two-dimensional surface.

CART 202: Drawing II. 3 credits

Continuation of CART 201. Emphasizes perceptual drawing skills. Students are also introduced to a variety of materials.

Prerequisite: CART 201.

CART 217: Printmaking I. 3 credits

Introduction to hand printmaking. Stresses creativity, experimentation, and development of skill and craftsmanship in printing procedures.

Prerequisite: CART 101, 02, 201 or permission of instructor.

 

CART 240: Art History Survey I. 3 credits

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of Western Art before the Renaissance and an overview of cross-cultural artistic developments in ancient Africa, Asia and the Americas.

 

CART 241: Art History Survey II. 3 credits

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of Western Art since the Renaissance, and an overview of cross-cultural artistic developments in Africa and Asia since 1200.

 

CART 275: Photography I. 3 credits

Basic photography skills for students with little prior knowledge of photography. Students are introduced to the basics of camera handling and image composition. One requirement of the course is a camera with a manually adjustable shutter speed control and aperture dial.


CART 277: Computer Imaging Basics. 3 credits

Introduction to various software programs including adobe Illustrator, adobe Photoshop and scanning techniques.

CART 301: Art Direction/Design I. 3 credits

Introduction to the study of letterforms, including a study of typefaces and letter spacing, composition, and their applications to the design of visual communication materials.

Prerequisites: CART 101, CART 102, and CART 277 or permission of instructor.

CART 302: Art Direction/Design II. 3 credits

Covers visual and symbolic communication, including generation of visual symbols, graphic simplification, communication of content through form, and visual metaphor. Further development of technical skills.

Prerequisite: CART 301 or permission of instructor.

CART 303: Advanced Drawing. 3 credits

Investigation of advanced drawing techniques with an emphasis on figure drawing.

Prerequisites: CART 101, CART 102, CART 201, and CART 202 or permission of instructor.

CART 315: Illustration I. 3 credits

Basic illustration conceptualization. Develops students’ professional illustration techniques and processes.

Prerequisites: CART 201 and CART 202 or permission of instructor.

CART 317: Printmaking II. 3 credits

Continuation of CART 217. Students introduced to intermediate printmaking concepts.

Prerequisites: CART 101, 102, 201, and 217.

CART 375: Photography II. 3 credits

Continuation of CART 275. Students are required to form a personal vision through directed assignments.

Prerequisite: CART 275 or permission of instructor.

CART 379: Advanced Computer Imaging. 3 credits

Covers advanced computer graphics imaging utilizing graphics software for visual communication.

Prerequisites: CART 101, 102, 201, or permission of instructor. Academic advisor’s approval is required.

CART 401: Art Direction/Design III. 3 credits

Ideas of sequence and series, organization, and typographic hierarchy are addressed through poster, brochure, and book design. Package design principles are also explored.

Prerequisites: CART 301 and CART 302 or permission of instructor.

CART 402: Art Direction/Design IV. 3 credits

The study of advanced digital imaging techniques. Content includes the development of advertising campaigns utilizing creative briefs. Synthesizes concepts learned in typography and image communication through the development of visual programs for sequential viewing.

Prerequisites: CART 301, CART 302, and CART 401, or permission of instructor.

CART 413: African Fabric Design. 3 credits

Focuses on analysis of African fabric designs in terms of their patterns and social functions. Emphasis is on the appropriate use of African fabric design for fashion and commercial art design.

CART 444: Seminar In Twentieth-Century Art. 3 credits

Investigates topics pertinent to the studio artist. Focus is on the impact of recent art history on the work of contemporary artists.

CART 488: Internship. 3 credits

On-the-job training in the work world. Students can qualify for an internship after the freshman year.

Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson.

CART 490: Independent Study. 3 credits

In consultation with a department faculty member, upper-division students may select an appropriate subject to explore. The independent study requires each participating student, working with a department faculty member, to develop a proposal outlining the scope of the project and the hourly credit to be assigned.

CART 492: Portfolio. 3 credits

Capstone course for senior art majors. Includes preparation for portfolio presentation, job searches, interview techniques, oral presentations and organizing exhibitions. Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson.

CART 499: Special Topics. 3 credits

CFAS 495 Independent Study

In consultation with a faculty member, upper-division students may select an appropriate subject to explore. The independent study requires each participating student, working with a department faculty member, to develop a proposal outlining the scope of the project and the hourly credit to be assigned.

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art (122 Credits)
Students in this program have the option to choose a concentration in General Studio Art or in Advertising Design.

 

Program Description

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art with General Studio Concentration curricula is designed to encourage intellectual development and growth as well as to develop marketable skills of students interested in preparing for work in art and arts related management and education options. Graduates of this program will have the content knowledge to pursue advanced graduate level study in painting, sculpture, printmaking, and photography or teaching K-12.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Concentration in General Studio Art will be able to:

  1. Create effective visual art products.
  2. Justify design/creative solutions in critiquing creative projects.
  3. Demonstrate mastery of imaging technologies.
  4. Know and discuss art history from a cross-cultural background with specific awareness of African-American artistic developments.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art with Advertising Design Concentration curricula is to prepare students intending to enter art industry to pursue careers in a wide array of visual communications areas including advertising art direction, design and illustration for digital and print products, web design, graphic design, photography, and studio production.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Concentration in Advertising Design will be able to:

  1. Create effective visual communication products.  
  2. Justify design/creative solutions in critiquing creative projects.
  3. Demonstrate mastery of imaging technologies.
  4. Know and discuss art history from a cross-cultural background with specific awareness of African-American artistic developments.
Admissions Requirements

Applicants to the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art with Concentrations in General Studio Art or Advertising Design must meet the General Admission Requirements as presented in the Clark Atlanta University Undergraduate Catalog.

Degree Requirements

In addition to the General Degree Requirements as published in the Clark Atlanta University Undergraduate Catalog, students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art with Concentrations in General Studio Art or Advertising Design (both concentrations require 57 credit hours in the major) must complete the following courses:

Required Common Courses:  33 Credits

CART 101, Art Foundations I (3)
CART 102, Art Foundations II (3)
CART 201, Drawing I (3)
CART 202, Drawing II (3)
CART 303, Advanced Drawing (3)  
SART 141, History of Art I (3) *^
SART 142, History of Art II (3) *^
CART 275, Photography I (3)
CART 277, Computer Imaging Basics (3) or
CART 379, Advanced Computer Imaging (3)*
CART 217, Printmaking (3)
CART 492, Senior Seminar (3)
 
*Advanced placement assessed through interview with instructor.
^Courses offered at Spelman College Campus.
Additional Required Courses for Advertising Design: 12 credits
CART 301, Art Direction/Design I (3)
CART 302, Art Direction/Design II (3)
CART 401, Art Direction/Design III (3)
CART 402, Art Direction/Design IV (3)
Advertising Design Concentration Electives:  12 Credits
CART 375, Photography II (3)
CART 451, Directed Study: Illustration
CART 456, Directed Study: Photography
CART 457, Directed Study: Printmaking
CART 462, Directed Study: Advertising Design
CART 479, Directed Study: Computer Imaging
CART 480, Internship
CBUS 335, Principles of Marketing (3)
CBUS 336, Consumer Behavior (3)
CBUS 431, Principles of Advertising (3)
CBUS 480, Entrepreneurship and Enterprise (3)
CMMA 201, Survey of Media and Society (3)
CMMA 301, News Editing I (Copywriting) (3)
CMMA 338, Media Advertising and Sales (3) 
 
General Studio Concentration Electives:  24 Credits
CART 301, Art Direction/Design I (3)
CART 302, Art Direction/Design II (3)
CART 315, Illustration I (3)
CART 317, Printmaking II (3)
CART 375, Photography II (3)
CART 379, Advanced Computer Imaging (3)
CART 413, African Fabric Design (3)
CART 444, Seminar in Contemporary Art (3)
CART 451, Directed Study: Illustration
CART 456, Directed Study: Photography
CART 457, Directed Study: Printmaking
CART 462, Directed Study: Advertising Design
CART 479, Directed Study: Computer Imaging
CART 488, Internship (3)
 

Note: And any approved art or art history course offered at Spelman College

Additional Requirements:

Students in both concentrations must declare either: 1) an official Minor (18 hours minimum); or 2) selects a minimum of two stackable credentials (in most cases 18-24 hours). Students who started as First Year or transfer students with less than 40 earned semester hours would be required to declare their choice of options before the end of the second semester sophomore year. Transfer students with 40 or more earned semester hours are required to declare their intention of a specific minor or two sets of stackable credentials on entering the University. In most cases students will have 12-15 hours of free electives to pursue interests outside the major or minor. We wish to keep as much flexibility as possible to accommodate each student’s specific career or post-baccalaureate goals but we have identified “suggested” options to consider:

Suggested Minors: Fashion Design, Theater Arts
Suggested Credentials: Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Financial Literacy

General Education Courses:  33 Credits

AREA A: Humanities/ Fine Arts: 6 credits
Recommended: CHUM 230 The Modern Period (3), CMUS 120 Music Appreciation (3), or CSTA 252 Theater Appreciation (3)
 
AREA B: Social/ Behavioral Sciences: 6 Credits
Recommended: CPSY 211 General Psychology (3), CPSY 218 Human Growth and Development (3), or CSCJ 215 Introduction to Sociology (3)
 
AREA C: Natural Sciences/ Mathematics/ Statistics: 6 credits
CMAT 103 College Algebra or higher (3), Recommended: CBIO Biological Sciences (3), CPHY 102 Physical Science (3), or CPHY 104 Earth System Science (3)
 
AREA D: Communications: 9 credits
CENG 105 College Composition I (3) or CENG 106 College Composition II (3) and CSTA 101 Speech Communications (3)
 
AREA E: Financial/ Technological: 6 Credits
CART 277 Computer Imaging Basics (3) and Recommended: CBUS 250 Financial Planning (3), or CBUS 209 Accounting for Non-business Majors (3)

Free Electives:  30 Credits  

Note:  Free Electives should be chosen in consultation with the advisor, students must complete a minor or two stackable credentials for the degree.

 

International Study Opportunities

The department encourages students to consider studying in a foreign country as part of an overall educational experience. Study abroad creates unique opportunities for intellectual and personal growth. Students from the department have studied in (but are not limited to) London, Paris, Provence, Milan and Florence in recent years. Please contact the Office of the Director of Study Abroad for additional information on possible locations for study and strategies to fund these opportunities. Contact Dr. Bridgette Tei in the Fashion Merchandising & Design Department (btei@cau.edu), for sample plans for international study abroad.

Fashion Program

The Fashion Design Concentration focuses on training students to develop apparel for various markets in keeping with creative, technical, and economic factors of the fashion world as well as emphasizes on the creative aspects of designing and developing merchandise for manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers. The program prepares students for entering the apparel industry as apparel designers, costume designers for theatre, assistant fashion stylists/wardrobes, fashion coordinators, production managers, product developers, computer-aided design specialists, merchandisers, findings/trimming buyers, fabric buyers, showroom sales representatives and entrepreneurs.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Bachelor of Art in Fashion with Fashion Design Concentration will be able to:

  1. Identify and apply design elements and trends from key eras of fashion history in clothing construction, patternmaking, draping techniques and computer imaging.  

  2. Apply aesthetic principles and elements of design to the development, selection, evaluation of apparel and other textile products.

  3. Discuss factors relevant to design history and theory that constitute apparel quality and fit.

  4. Design, develop, and construct fashion illustrations, patterns, computer-aided designs, garment prototypes, apparel and other related fashion products using fashion tools, techniques, and processes.

  5. Analyze problems and formulate solutions related to fashion design, textile, styling, apparel production and marketing issues.

 
The Merchandising Concentration prepares students through structured learning processes to understand industry innovations, challenging careers, current trends, and the impact of globalization, technological advances and the expansion of designers into new and broader categories. The merchandising concentration covers both the retailers and manufacturers needs for merchandisers and product developers. Merchandising reflects the planning, organizational, and sales aspects of the fashion business. Students learn how to merchandise apparel products and how to develop planning modules. They will understand target markets and how to develop promotional plans for various products and events to meet the goals of a successful business.
 
The opportunities for employment are varied and depend upon the student’s interests and abilities. Careers are available in retailing as buyer, planner, manager, fashion coordinator, market researcher; in promotion ad display coordinator, public relations director, advertising manager; in wholesaling as manufacturing representative, showroom sales associate, and in apparel and textile manufacturing as sales associate, piece goods buyer, merchandising manager, market research; in publications as Fashion Stylist, advertising manager, fashion editor.
 
Guest speakers, field trips and study tours permit students to have contact with businesses and industry professionals. Qualified students may gain additional professional experiences through multiple internships.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Bachelor of Art in Fashion with Merchandising Concentration will be able to:

  1. Apply the key principles and elements of fashion design and merchandising.
  2. Research, define, and evaluate criteria and requirements for merchandise apparel products and develop planning modules. Discuss factors relevant to design history and theory that constitute apparel quality and fit.
  3. Develop promotional planning strategies for target markets, products and events within the fashion industry.
  4. Identify and apply the phases of fashion development from design to production, and marketing to sales.
  5. Utilize the appropriate technologies to develop visual merchandising layouts, displays, events and presentations.

CFAS 210: Principles of Fashion Apparel. Principles of Fashion Industry. 3 credits
Introduction to the fashion industry. Emphasis on fashion design, fashion merchandising and fashion marketing.
Prerequisites: CART 101 and 102.

CFAS 201: Creative Fashion Presentation. 3 credits
Involves the study of the complexity of fashion presentations. Students will learn how to research, analyze, and forecast trends,

CFAS 220: History of Costume. 3 credits
Chronological study of costumes from ancient Egyptian to 20th-century styles. Emphasis on culture, art form, and climates are related to the cause and effect of costumes in each period.
Prerequisites: CART 101 and 102.

CFAS 230: Textiles. 3 credits
Study of fibers, yarns, and weaves, fancy weaves, finishes and dyes. Students develop a familiarity with the application of fabrics in the apparel field.
Prerequisites: CART 101 and 102.

CFAS 237: Fashion Illustration. 3 credits
Fundamentals of rendering to communicate fashion design ideas. Students learn to draw the male and female fashion figure. Students learn to utilize color, proportion, fabric and methods for making quick sketches to illustrate different styles.
Prerequisites: CART 101 Art Foundation I, CART 102 Art Foundation II, CART 201 Drawing

CFAS 240: Apparel Construction I. 3 credits
Fosters the development of professional skills and techniques required for apparel construction.
Prerequisites: CART 101 and 102.

CFAS 250. Visual Merchandising. 3 credits
Facets of visual merchandising including the make-up of a Visual Merchandising department and the associated aspects of visual identity.
Prerequisites: CART 101 and 102.

CFAS 310: Flat Pattern. 3 credits
Fundamentals of basic principles of flat patternmaking are covered, including
slopers for collars, sleeves, bodices, skirts, and pants.
Prerequisite: CFAS 240 or permission of instructor.

CFAS 314: Promotional Planning Strategies. 3 credits
Comprehensive study integrating all phases of fashion marketing channels. Emphasis on the scope and importance of each phase and the necessity of identifying target markets and developing appropriate strategies.
Prerequisites: CFAS 210.

CFAS 320: Draping. 3 credits
The execution of a design from working sketches to a finished garment using draping
techniques of fabric on the dress form.
Prerequisite: CFAS 310 or permission of instructor.

CFAS 325: Wardrobe Styling and Consulting. 3 credits
Development of ideas for personal wardrobe styling including photography, window display, promotion and fashion shows. Students will utilize creativity in the selection of fashion images which are then styled and photographed.

CFAS 340: Apparel Construction II. 3 credits
A continuation of Apparel Construction I with emphasis on design details. Instruction in basic manipulation of commercial patterns to create individual details, construction of fully lined unstructured garments in intermediate level fabrics.
Prerequisites: CFAS 240

CFAS 350: Fashion Accessory Design. 3 credits
A capsulated overview of the field that identifies the industry’s major components, products and processors, manufacturers and designers, retailers and promoters.
Prerequisites: CFAS 210, 220 and 240.

CFAS 360: Fashion Apparel CAD. 3 credits
Development of fashion design in various formats by utilizing computer-aided design software programs. 

CFAS 401: Retail Mathematics. 3 credits
Application of essential concepts, policies, procedures, mathematical calculations and interpretation of figures that relate to the many factors that produce profit in a fashion business.
Prerequisites: CMAT 103 and 104, CFAS 314.

CFAS 402: Fashion Buying and Planning 3 credits 
Examines budgeting, marketing objectives, volume and profit, merchandise assortment planning, expenditure control, and inventory management. Case studies highlight problems of the fashion marketplace.
Prerequisites: CMAT 103 and 104, CFAS 314, and 440.

CFAS 410: Fashion Design Senior Collection. 3 credits
A comprehensive course that allows students to apply skills in the development of a line of merchandise incorporating patternmaking, apparel construction and portfolio preparation.
Prerequisite: CART 101, 102, 201, CFAS 240, 310.

CFAS 420: Fashion Show Production. 3 credits
Involves the production of a full-scale fashion show featuring student designs
and methods of promotion. 
Prerequisites: Must be a Junior or Senior

CFAS 425: Case Studies in Fashion Marketing. 3 credits
Involves the application of fashion marketing to analyze and solve case study problems. Students learn to develop a plan of action.
Prerequisite: CFAS 314, CFAS 401.

CFAS 430: Trend Forecasting. 3 credits
The course provides information on current fashion trends in the market. Students will learn to predict looks of the future, develop reports based on observations of fashion trends and how trends influence the development of individual designs.

CFAS 440: Retail Management. 3 credits
Study of retail industry, emphasizing the interdependence of functional operations of stores, types of merchandising, and the interrelationship of the major facets of the industry and its markets.
Prerequisites: CFAS 210, 220 and 250.

CFAS 450: Fashion Design Portfolio. 3 credits
Development of a design portfolio utilizing various media. Students will develop a fashion portfolio of creative work in a specialized area by creating an original line.
Prerequisites: CART 237, 277, CFAS 360 or permission of the Instructor.

CFAS 480: Internship. 3 – 6 variable credits
Student participation in a supervised fashion industry work experience to increase professional skills. Open only to majors.

CFAS 490: Fashion Merchandising Senior Seminar. 3 credits
Capstone course. Study of problems in various aspects of the purchase of fashion merchandise and the planning involved in marketing merchandise and computer applications in retailing.

CFAS 495 Independent Study
In consultation with a faculty member, upper-division students may select an appropriate subject to explore. The independent study requires each participating student, working with a department faculty member, to develop a proposal outlining the scope of the project and the hourly credit to be assigned.

CFAS 499: Special Topics. 3 credits

Admissions Requirements

Applicants to the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Fashion with a concentration in Fashion Design or Merchandising must meet the General Admission Requirements as presented in the Clark Atlanta University Undergraduate Catalog.

Degree Requirements

In addition to the General Degree Requirements as published in the Clark Atlanta University Undergraduate Catalog students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Fashion with a concentration in Fashion Design or Merchandising must complete the following courses:
Required Common Courses:  33 Credits
CART 101, Art Foundations I (3)
CART 102, Art Foundations II (3)
CART 277, Computer Imaging Basics (3)
CFAS 210, Principles of Fashion Industry (3)
CFAS 220, History of Costume (3)
CFAS 230, Textiles (3)
CFAS 250, Visual Merchandising (3)
CFAS 314, Promotional Planning Strategies (3)
CFAS 440, Retail Management (3)
CFAS 420 Fashion Show Production (3)
CFAS 480, Internship (3)

Additional Required Courses for Fashion Design: 30 credits

CART 201, Drawing I (3)
CFAS 237, Fashion Illustration (3)
CFAS 240, Apparel Construction I (3)
CFAS 241, Apparel Construction II (3)
CFAS 310, Flat Pattern (3)
CFAS 320, Draping (3)
CFAS 350, Fashion Accessory Design (3)
CFAS 360, Fashion CAD (3)
CFAS 410, Fashion Design Senior Collection (3)
CFAS 450, Fashion Design Portfolio (3)

Free Electives for Fashion Design:  24 Credits

Note:  Free Electives should be chosen in consultation with the advisor, depending on the choice of minor or stackable credentials.

Additional Required Courses for Merchandising:  21 Credits

CFAS 201, Creative Fashion Presentation (3)
CFAS 325, Wardrobe Styling & Consulting (3)
CFAS 401, Retail Mathematics (3)
CFAS 402, Fashion Buying and Planning (3)
CFAS 425, Case Studies in Fashion Marketing (3)
CFAS 430, Trend Forecasting (3)
CFAS 490, Fashion Merchandising Seminar (3)

Merchandising Concentration Electives:  3 Credits

CART 275, Photography (3)
CART 379, Advanced Computer Imaging (3)
CBUS 206, Management Information Systems (3)
CBUS 209, Accounting for Non-Business Majors (3)
CECO 250, Principles of Economics (3)
CBUS 335, Principles of Marketing (3)
CBUS 336, Consumer Behavior (3)
CBUS 431, Principles of Advertising (3)
CBUS 340, Principles of Management (3)
CBUS 372, Personnel Management (3)
CBUS 480, Entrepreneurship and Enterprise (3)
CMMA 201, Survey of Media and Society (3)
CMMA 301, News Editing I (Copywriting) (3)
CMMA 338, Media Advertising and Sales (3)
 

Additional Requirements:

Students in both concentrations must declare either: 1) an official Minor (18 hours minimum); or 2) selects a minimum of two stackable credentials (in most cases 18-24 hours). Students who started as First Year or transfer students with less than 40 earned semester hours would be required to declare their choice of options before the end of the second semester sophomore year. Transfer students with 40 or more earned semester hours are required to declare their intention of a specific minor or two sets of stackable credentials on entering the University.

In most cases students will have 12-15 hours of free electives to pursue interests outside the major or minor.

General Education Courses:  33 Credits

AREA A: Humanities/ Fine Arts: 6 credits
Recommended: CHUM 230 The Modern Period (3), CART 150 Art Appreciation (3), CMUS 120 Music Appreciation (3), or CSTA 252 Theater Appreciation (3)
 
AREA B: Social/ Behavioral Sciences: 6 Credits
Recommended: CPSY 211 General Psychology (3), CPSY 218 Human Growth and Development (3), or CSCJ 215 Introduction to Sociology (3)
 
AREA C: Natural Sciences/ Mathematics/ Statistics: 6 credits
CMAT 103 College Algebra or higher (3), Recommended: CBIO Biological Sciences (3), CPHY 102 Physical Science (3), or CPHY 104 Earth System Science (3)
 
AREA D: Communications: 9 credits
CENG 105 College Composition I (3) or CENG 106 College Composition II (3) and CSTA 101 Speech Communications (3)
 
AREA E: Financial/ Technological: 6 Credits
CART 277 Computer Imaging Basics (3) and Recommended: CBUS 250 Financial Planning (3), or CBUS 209 Accounting for Non-business Majors (3)
 
Free Electives:  30 Credits  

Note:  Free Electives should be chosen in consultation with the advisor, depending on the choice of minor or stackable credentials.

Study Abroad

Students in the Fashion Design and Merchandising Program have the opportunity to participate in CAU’s International Studies Program. Students are immersed in the culture, such as study abroad tours in London, England and Milan, Italy and Paris, France. While studying abroad, students gain a global experience to broaden their prospective in the areas of fashion design and fashion-related retail merchandising.

Information for Internship Students

Course Credit Fashion Internships (CFAS 480 Internship)

The department requires students to complete a minimum of one fashion-related 3-credit internship as part of an overall educational experience. Internships create unique opportunities for intellectual and career growth. It also affords students the chance to enhance their resumes and further develop their portfolios or expand their professional network. Students are also able to apply techniques and content covered in the classroom in a real-life setting.

Fashion Internship Requirements:

  • Students are responsible for securing their own internships. Internship opportunities may be available through the Department and/or faculty but are not guaranteed.
  • Must submit an Internship Approval Form before the deadline
  • Must complete at least 150 internship hours for a 3-credit internship*
  • Must complete one internship for course credit (i.e. you may not combine multiple internships for course credit)
  • You may not earn more than a total of 9 credit hours in course credit with your internships
  • Internships must be completed during the enrollment period for course credit (i.e. course credit cannot be earned for retroactive or future internships). However, you may complete a summer internship for enrollment and course credit the following Fall semester**

*Students must complete at least 300 internship hours for a 6-credit internship
**Internship Approval Forms must be completed, signed and dated by Internship Supervisors at the beginning of the internship period

Examples of permissible fashion-related internships include those that involve:

  • Fashion/apparel product design and development
  • Fashion CAD/technical design and fashion production/manufacturing
  • Fashion illustration
  • Patternmaking
  • Costume design, tailoring, alternations and light apparel construction, sample making
  • Retail: Apparel, accessories, footwear, beauty/cosmetics, fabric, craft/art supplies (including pop-up shops)
  • Merchandise buying and planning, merchandising
  • Fashion wholesale (e.g. Apparel Mart, tradeshows and industry markets)
  • Fashion styling and image consultation
  • Hairstyling and make-up services
  • Trend forecasting and trend presentation
  • Editorial: Fashion and lifestyle magazines (print or digital) or other fashion publications
  • Museums/galleries: Exhibitions, events, curation and archival work/research
  • Marketing, branding, graphic design
  • Social media, PR/press, blogs, online content development
  • Events planning, fashion/hair shows
  • Modeling agencies and fit modeling
  • Photography studios, fashion photography
  • Media: Film/TV, advertising, radio, music 

Internships that are not permitted:

  • Internships with immediate family or relatives as Internship Supervisors
  • Internships with current CAU students as Internship Supervisors
  • Internships with yourself (as a freelancer etc.) and/or your own business (in any capacity)
  • Internships with unrelated internal institutional offices or departments such as OITC, Financial Aid, Student Services etc.
  • Work done as part of the Work Study program
  • Non-related retail: Grocery, office supplies, pharmacies etc.
  • Other internships that do not fit the criteria outlined under “permissible fashion-related internships” above. 

You may contact the Internship Coordinator if you have additional questions about the nature of an internship.

Steps for participating in the CFAS 480 Internship course:

  1. Review the criteria above regarding permissible and non-permissible internships
  2. Review the “Guidelines for Interns” Guidelines for Interns
  3. Secure an internship
  4. Enroll in the CFAS 480 Internship course via BannerWeb – please ensure you select the correct number of credits (3 credits is the default on BannerWeb)
  5. Complete an Internship Approval Form – this must also be completed, signed and dated by your Internship Supervisor in the designated area. The Internship Coordinator for the course does not need to sign the bottom of the form before its submission.
  6. Attend the first day of class for additional information, a course syllabus and the Q & A session

Please note that all forms for previous semesters are now void. Only forms for current or applicable semesters will be deemed valid. Current forms will also be available via Canvas.

Information for Internship Supervisors

Guidelines for Internship Supervisors

If you are interested in recruiting student talent for internships please review the Guidelines for Internship Supervisors.

Responsibilities for Internship Supervisors:

  1. Please review the list of permissible fashion-related internships in the section titled “Information for Internship Students” to ensure your internship opportunity matches our fashion internship requirements.
  2. Review the “Guidelines for Internship Supervisors” Guidelines for Internship Supervisors
  3. Complete an Internship Approval Form (i.e. the portion designated for the Internship Supervisor). Upon completion, please send it directly to the Intern for submission. This form is required for all internships completed for CFAS 480 course credit and must be submitted by the student before the applicable due date. In most cases, the Intern will complete his/her portion before sending you the form for completion. Please make sure to include your contact information and sign and date the form. Internship Approval Form.
  4. Provide fair, accurate assessment of the Intern’s performance by completing a midterm and final evaluation
  5. IMPORTANT: Must provide an email address with a business domain (e.g. [email]@[businessdomain.comor email address that is visible on the establishment’s website and/or social media – please ensure regular and uninterrupted access to this account during the duration of the internship
  6. Should communicate any changes/updates (including changes to your contact information) via the email address provided (which meets the criteria above) to help maintain the security and privacy of our students. 

Thank you for your interest in our students and the Fashion program. We look forward to a possible internship partnership with you and your establishment. 

SEWING LAB ACCESS POLICY

OGLETHORPE HALL                                                                 

In order to improve the longevity, availability, lifespan of equipment and supplies for students at various stages of their matriculation, we ask that students please review and adhere to the policy below:

The sewing labs on the third floor of Oglethorpe Hall are available to Fashion majors (Fashion Design concentration only) and students pursuing minors in Fashion Design or Professional Apparel for Fashion for class or academic use only.

Students must also be currently enrolled in applicable sewing courses (see below) or have completed CFAS 241 Apparel Construction I (or an equivalent approved course) in order to use the sewing labs and gain access outside scheduled class times and/or during extended hours. Extended hours for sewing lab access are available for class or academic use only and are subject to change or cancellation. Authorization to use sewing machines outside of allotted classroom times must be completed through Ms. Dasque.

Applicable sewing courses are listed below:

  • CFAS 241 Apparel Construction I
  • CFAS 241 Apparel Construction II
  • CFAS 310 Flat Pattern
  • CFAS 320 Draping
  • CFAS 350 Fashion Accessory Design  instructor approval needed
  • CFAS 410 Fashion Design Senior Collection
  • CFAS 495 Independent Study  instructor approval needed based on nature of course work
  • CFAS 499 Special Topics – instructor approval needed based on nature of course work
Department of African American Studies, Africana Womens Studies, and History

The Department of African American Studies, Africana Women’s Studies and History (AWH) at Clark Atlanta University provides a vital and innovative interdisciplinary course of research, study, and learning. Students explore past events historic global issues, diverse cultures, and our shared humanity.

Mission Statements

History: The mission of the CAU Degree in History is to prepare students in the major and in other disciplines with historical knowledge of human experience, past events and the understanding of global issues, diverse cultures, and our shared humanity.

African American Studies: The mission of the CAU Degree in African-American Studies is to offer undergraduates and graduates an interdisciplinary course of study that expands and imparts knowledge related to cultures, and the history of the African Diaspora utilizing scholarly research, theoretical inquiry and policy analysis to prepare graduates for diverse professions who will understand experiences of people of African descent and others as well as promote social justice within the global community.

Africana Women’s Studies: The mission of the CAU Degree in Africana Women’s Studies is to offer undergraduates and graduates an interdisciplinary course of study that expands and imparts knowledge related to gender, cultures, and the history of the African Diaspora utilizing scholarly research, theoretical inquiry and policy analysis to prepare graduates for diverse professions who will understand experiences of people of African descent and others as well as promote social justice within the global community.

History

The History program serves as a center for historical study, providing a core base of knowledge of past events and fostering an atmosphere to examine the significance of those events on the human experience. With a commitment to academic excellence, the department offers undergraduate and graduate level courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree, Master of Arts degree and the Doctor of Arts in Humanities degree. The department stresses the development of analytical skills and critical judgment. Curriculum emphasis is placed on acquiring scholarly research and writing skills along with an understanding of global issues, diverse cultures, and our shared humanity. As an extension of the classroom instruction, students are encouraged to engage in practical applications of learning through service learning projects, internships, and study abroad opportunities.

African American Studies

The African and African American Studies Program is designed for students with professional interest in a comprehensive understanding of African American or African culture. The program provides focus as well as breadth through the interdisciplinary area studies approach. Because of the long tradition of African and African American studies at the University, pertinent courses are offered in many departments, particularly English, Foreign Language, History, Political Science, and Sociology.

Africana Women’s Studies

Founded in 1982, the Africana Women’s Studies (AWS) Program is the only degree-granting women’s studies program located in a historically black college in the United States, the only women’s studies program in the United States which offers the doctoral degree in Africana Women’s Studies and the only Africana Women’s Studies program in the world. AWS provides opportunities for the systematic analysis of the convergence of gender, class and racial bias. It also focuses on the comparative examination of the contributions, problems, strategies and concerns of women throughout the African disapora.

For more information regarding each program, view the following resources:

The W.E.B. Du Bois Legacy Project

The Du Bois Legacy Project was initiated and organized by Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans, chair of the Department of African American Studies, Africana Women’s Studies and History (AWH), with the support of CAU President Carlton E. Brown and the participation of a broad-based coalition of Clark Atlanta University students, staff, administrators, and faculty. The legacy continues with the leadership and support of Dr. Obie Clayton and Dr. Barbara Combs, past and present chairs of the Sociology Department.

Visit the W. E. B. Du Bois Legacy Project website

Is CAU Built on Sacred Ground?

Indeed it is! Ours is a University where history abounds. To learn why the lawns of Harkness Quadrangle are “off limits” to pedestrians, read this issue of the Atlanta University Bulletin from July 1936.

Music

The Department of Music trains students to become professionals in music educators, performers, and commercial composers nationally and internationally. Notable alumni include Ryan Kilgore, Harry Pace, and more.

Large ensembles include The Philharmonic Society (concert choir), Concert and Marching Bands, Jazz Orchestra, and The Atlanta University Center-wide Symphony Orchestra.  Concert and Marching Bands have a number of smaller units, and the CAU Jazz Orchestra has CAU Jazztet.

The music major’s professional preparation includes a judicious mixture of the following: music theory, music history and literature, individual music performance; performance in ensembles; and special skills that include basic piano, conducting, practical applications of and exposure to technology, and/or methodologies, skill sets, and in-depth knowledge relevant to the various concentrations. 

For musically talented students pursuing other disciplines, the department offers a music minor in each concentration. Additional opportunities for participation in our performing ensembles are also available to the general student population, as well as music majors and minors. Large ensembles include The Philharmonic Society (concert choir), concert and marching Bands, Jazz Orchestra, and The Atlanta University Center Orchestra. Smaller non-credit performing ensembles are organized through the department’s performance seminar courses (CMUS114A/B –CMUS 414A/B). Membership in the ensembles is by audition. Prospective ensemble members should review the music department’s admissions page for more information.

Students must have sufficient preparatory study and experience before matriculating at Clark Atlanta University as either music majors or minors. Admission to the Clark Atlanta University Music Department as a music major or minor requires acceptance by both the University Office of Admissions and the Music Department. Acceptance into the university does not guarantee acceptance as a music major or minor. Prospective students should adhere to the following guidelines to facilitate full acceptance as music majors or minors.

Preparatory Study

It is strongly recommended that prospective CAU music majors have the following pre-college experiences prior to entering the university:

  • Study an applied instrument (voice, percussion, brass, wind or string instrument) privately with a professional teacher for at least two (2) years with the exception of piano majors, who should study six (6) years;
  • Study piano at least two (2) years (all non-pianists); and
  • Take an introductory Music Theory course (commonly called Music Fundamentals) before entering the university.
  • Engage the help and advice of a professional music teacher before applying to any college or university. This person will normally be a private music teacher or a high school music teacher who is familiar with the requirements of a college/university level music program.

University Admissions

All prospective students must first satisfy the admissions criteria of Clark Atlanta University. University admissions procedures are as follows:

  • Complete application for admission;
  • Pay admission fee;
  • Have previous academic institution forward official transcript – high school transcript for recent high school graduates, college or university transcript for transfer students, or the general equivalency diploma (GED);
  • Forward report of SAT or ACT test scores from college testing; and
  • Submit two (2) letters of recommendation from teachers and/or counselors. Visit the CAU web site at www.cau.edu and link to Admissions for detailed information.

Music Department Admissions

Admission to Clark Atlanta University does not guarantee acceptance as a music major or minor. All prospective music majors and minors must satisfy departmental entrance requirements to declare music as a major or minor:

  • Submit a letter of intent via e-mail or snail mail to include anticipated entrance date;
  • Arrange an interview with an appropriate music faculty member. Appropriate faculty members include the department chair, the coordinator of the appropriate concentration program of study, and/or ensemble director;
  • Schedule and perform an audition on an instrument of choice and primary strength (voice, piano, string, woodwind, brass, percussion); and
  • Take a theory and/or piano Placement Tests.

Auditions

Auditions normally occur during the academic year prior to the student’s anticipated arrival at Clark Atlanta University. For example, the typical high school graduate or university transfer student enters the university in August. That student will have completed the audition process during the previous year sometime between the months of October and March. Likewise, students who enter during the spring semester, i.e. in January, will have completed the audition process by the previous October.

Link to Auditions for more information.

Placement Tests

Placement tests are normally given during New Student Orientation Week (the CAU Experience) in either August, for the fall semester, or January for the spring semester. They will also be given throughout the year during either of the published audition dates in October, January, or March. New students cannot guarantee registration in any theory course or Piano Class before taking the Theory Placement Test. This test determines if the student is ready to take college level music Music Theory (CMUS 201)  and Piano Class (CMUS 117A) or if they need a preparatory course of study via Music Fundamentals (CMUS 101). All students should note that, as a preparatory course, CMUS 101: Music Fundamentals does not count towards graduation requirements. Students who pass the Theory Placement Test are normally placed in CMUS 201: Music Theory and CMUS 117A: Piano Class, but they may need additional placement guidance for piano placement if they have a solid background of piano study. This directive does not apply to piano majors and minors, who are required to enroll in Applied Piano instead of Piano Class. If students choose to audition in August, during New Student Orientation, they must contact the Music Department to confirm the date, time, and location for the Placement Test. This test will normally occur on the Monday following the Academic Showcase (part of the CAU Experience). Contact Dr. David Gable at 404-880-8209.  After completion of the Theory Placement Test, additional piano placement guidance may be needed and will be provided by Prof. Mark Boozer at 404-880-8210.

Acceptance

Students must successfully complete the university admissions criteria, the music audition, and the theory placement test in order to be granted full admission into the Music Department. The following applies to voice majors only: Vocalists who successfully pass the performance audition are placed into the appropriate courses of primary Applied Music. Vocalists who do not pass their auditions are placed into the appropriate course(s) in secondary Applied Music for a period not to exceed two semesters. Re-auditioning opportunities are granted to such individuals.  Credit from the secondary applied course may be applied as credit towards the degree upon recommendation of the applied voice teacher.

Returning Students

Study on an applied instrument or voice requires ongoing, uninterrupted commitment in order to meet established competency requirements. Students who take time off from school are subject to loss of necessary skills. For this reason, returning students who have been out of school for two (2) or more semesters will be required to re-audition.

Satisfactory Progress

All students must select a desired concentration and demonstrate satisfactory progress in order to successfully complete a music degree. The concentrations are: Vocal Studies, Piano Studies, Jazz Studies, Commercial Music/Composition, and Church Music. A sixth option – General Music – offers the greatest degree of curriculum flexibility and is appropriate for most students who are not best served by the concentrations.

To qualify for Vocal Studies, Piano Studies, or Jazz Studies, students should demonstrate requisite performance skills at the time of audition, but they must pass the Sophomore Qualifying Jury at the end of their fourth semester of applied study. Students who do not pass the Sophomore Qualifying Jury may be allowed to pursue one of the other concentration options (if they have the requisite skills), elect music as  a minor, or they will be advised to pursue another major.  Coursework for most majors (other than music) typically begins in the junior year.

Students will be approved for the Commercial Music/Composition, Church Music, or the General Music option, if they demonstrate satisfactory academic progress by the end of their sophomore year and receive a recommendation from the coordinator of the appropriate concentration. Students who fail to meet these two criteria may be allowed to elect music as a minor or they will be advised to pursue another major.

In addition to the General Degree Requirements as published in the Clark Atlanta University Undergraduate Catalog, students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music must complete the following required courses:

Music Theory

CMUS 105, Sight Singing and Ear Training I (3)

CMUS 106, Sight Singing and Ear Training II (3)

CMUS 201, Music Theory I (3)

CMUS 202, Music Theory II (3)

CMUS 301, Music Theory III (3)

CMUS 302, Music Theory IV (3)

CMUS 304, Form and Analysis (3)

Music History

CMUS 316, Music History and Literature I (3)

CMUS 317, Music History and Literature II (3)

CMUS 318, Jazz History (3)

or

CMUS 320, African American Music (3)

Special Skills: Three (3) courses for students concentrating in Piano Studies and seven (7) courses for those students in other concentrations.

CMUS 117A, Piano Class (1)

CMUS 117B, Piano Class (1)

CMUS 204, Basic Conducting (2)

CMUS 218, Music Technology I (1)

CMUS 217A, Piano Class (1)

CMUS 217B, Piano Class (1)

* Regardless of concentration, students majoring in piano are exempt from the four (4) credit Piano Class sequence, CMUS 117A/B and CMUS 217A/B. Hence, their Special Skills requirement is three (3) credits. These students will substitute four (4) credits of music electives for the Piano Class sequence.

Performance *

CMUS 100 – 400, Ensembles (8) (8 semesters)

CMUS 107 – CMUS 408R, Applied Music (8) (8 semesters or 6 semesters and 2 recitals)

CMUS 114A – CMUS 414B, Performance Seminar (8) (8 semesters)

CMUS 115A – CMUS 415B, Music Seminar (0) (8 semesters)

* All applied music, ensembles, and performance seminars are 1 credit each.

Students will enroll in CMUS 308R and CMUS 408R for concentrations requiring a Junior Recital and a Senior Recital. Others will enroll in CMUS 308 and CMUS 408 for regular applied instruction.

Junior recitals must be approved by the applied teacher of instruction.

CONCENTRATIONS:

Within the five (5) concentrations, the following are required courses beginning in the junior year of study:

Voice Studies Concentration

CMUS 340, Vocal Diction I (1)

CMUS 342, Vocal Diction II (1)

CMUS 440, Vocal Pedagogy (3)

CMUS 308R, Junior Recital (1)

CMUS 344, Opera Workshop I (2)

CMUS 345, Opera Workshop II (2)

CMUS 442, Vocal Literature (3)

CMUS 408R, Senior Recital (1)

Piano Studies Concentration *

CMUS 308R, Junior Recital (1)

CMUS 330, Piano Repertoire (3)

CMUS 331, Piano Music from the African Diaspora (3)

CMUS 430, Piano Pedagogy I (3)

CMUS 431, Piano Pedagogy II (3)

CMUS 408R, Senior Recital (1)

* The Piano Studies Concentration requires an elective in lieu of the Piano Class Sequence (four (4) credits: CMUS 117 A and B and CMUS 217 A and B).

Recommended Electives *

CMUS 107 – 408, Applied Music (In another Concentration) (1)

CMUS 318, Jazz History (3)

CMUS 320, African American Music (3)

CMUS 351, Song Writing, Arranging and Recording (3)

or

CMUS 403, Orchestration and Arranging (3)

* Students should meet with their academic advisors for additional options.

Jazz Studies Concentration

CMUS 305A, Jazz Theory and Improvisation I (3)

CMUS 305B, Jazz Theory and Improvisation II (3)

CMUS 308R, Junior Recital (1) *

CMUS 318, Jazz History (3)

CMUS 405, Jazz Composition and Arranging (3)

CMUS 408R, Senior Recital (1)

or

CMUS 417, Senior Project (1) *

* Applied credit category

Concentration in Commercial Composition

CMUS 308R, Junior Recital (1) *

CMUS 351, Songwriting, Arranging and Recording (3)

CMUS 403, Orchestration (3)

CMUS 450, Recording Internship (3)

CMUS 451, Senior Composition Project (3)

CMUS 417, Senior Project (1) **

* Performance

** Composition presentation

Concentration in Church Music

CMUS 308R, Junior Recital (1)

CMUS 370, Introduction to Church Music (1)

CMUS 372, Hymnody (3)

CMUS 417, Senior Project (1)

CMUS 470, Music in the African American Church (3)

CMUS 472, Church Music Methods (2)

CMUS 472C, Church Music Methods Internship (3) *

* CMUS 472 is a Co-requisite for CMUS 472C.

Minor Concentration in Music (18-20 Credits)

The Minor Concentration in Music is primarily for students who have interest and proficiency in music but choose to major in other disciplines.

The key objective of the minor is to introduce students to university-level understanding of the cultural, historical, theoretical, and analytical situation of music across a variety of cultures and historical periods. Students complete two 100-level courses, which introduce the notion of inquiry-based musical scholarship, both of the traditional academic kind, and purely musical modes of inquiry such as interpretation, improvisation, transcription and analysis. Thereafter, a wide range of music courses is available for the students to complete the 18-20 credits required for the minor.

Students pursuing a Minor Concentration in Musicmay not select CMUS 120, Music Appreciation as their core Humanities requirement.

Educational Outcomes

Program Objectives

Students completing a Minor Concentration in Music will:

  1. Understand the cultural, historical, theoretical, and analytical situation of music across a variety of cultures and historical periods.
  2. Be able to analyze and evaluate musical performance from various perspectives.
  3. Comprehend the theoretical, formal, structural, and compositional music concepts.

Specialization in Vocal Studies

Required Courses (18 – 20 Credits)

CMUS 107 – 408, Applied Music (6 – 8) *

*Including CMUS 308R Junior Recital or CMUS 408R Senior Recital – requires approval by the applied instructor

CMUS 201, Music Theory I (3)

CMUS 340, Vocal Diction I (1)

CMUS 342, Vocal Diction II (1)

CMUS 344, Opera Workshop (1)

or

CMUS 345, Opera Workshop II (1)

CMUS 440, Vocal Pedagogy (3)

CMUS 442, Vocal Literature (3)

Specialization in Piano Studies

Required Courses (18 – 20 Credits)

CMUS 107 – 408, Applied Music (6 – 8) *

*Including CMUS 308R Junior Recital or CMUS 408R Senior Recital – requires approval by the applied instructor.

CMUS 201, Music Theory I (3)

CMUS 330, Piano Repertoire (3)

CMUS 331, Piano Music of the African Diaspora (3)

CMUS 430, Piano Pedagogy (3)

Specialization in Jazz Studies

Required Courses (18 Credits)

CMUS 107 – 408, Applied Music (6 – 8) *

*Including CMUS 308R Junior Recital or CMUS 408R Senior Recital – requires approval by the applied instructor or CMUS 113A – 313B or combination of applied and Jazz Orchestra.

CMUS 201, Music Theory I (3)

CMUS 318, Jazz History (3)

or

CMUS 320, African American Music (3)

CMUS 405, Jazz Composition and Arranging (3)

Specialization in Commercial Composition (18)

Required Courses (18 Credits)

CMUS 107–408, Applied Music (5)*

*included in those 5 hours is CMUS 417, Senior Project.

CMUS 201, Music Theory I (3)

CMUS 202, Music Theory II (3)

CMUS 218, Music Technology, (1)

CMUS 351, Songwriting and Arranging (3)

CMUS 450, Recording Internship (3)

Specialization in Church Music (18)

Required Courses (18 Credits)

CMUS 107-408, Applied Music (4)*

or

CMUS 110- 310, Atlanta University Orchestra (4)*

or

CMUS 111C-311D, Philharmonic Society (4)*

or

CMUS 112A-312B, University Band (4)*

CMUS 201, Music Theory I (3)

CMUS 204, Basic Conducting, (2)

CMUS 370, Introduction to Church Music (3)

CMUS 372, Hymnody (3)

CMUS 470 Music in the African American Church (3)

* Student may also select applied studies or combination of ensemble and applied or all applied studies for 4 credits.

All potential music majors and minors must successfully audition on a chosen instrument or as a vocalist. Students may audition in more than one area, but priority should be given to the strongest performing medium.  Regardless of the intended area of concentration (Vocal Studies, Piano Studies, Jazz Studies, Commercial Music/Composition, Church Music, or General Music),  an audition is required of all prospective students. All music majors and minors must declare a primary performing instrument. The same audition is also required for admission as a music minor. Prospective students should arrange to attend one of the available music audition dates on the Clark Atlanta University campus or to submit a quality recording at least two weeks prior to one of the audition dates, if they are unable to travel to Atlanta. Opportunities for audition by Skype or YouTube may be available in some instances, but this must be confirmed in advance. Students should note that all taped auditions shall count towards provisional acceptance. An on-campus, in-person audition will be required for full acceptance into the Music Department.

Students should submit a letter of intent via e-mail and arrange an interview with an appropriate music faculty member no later than 30 days prior to the planned audition date. Audition times and locations will be confirmed via e-mail or snail-mail shortly thereafter. Appropriate faculty members include the department chair, the coordinator of the appropriate concentration program of study, the faculty member who teaches the instrument/voice that the student wishes to study, and an ensemble director. Students should learn the name(s) of the teacher(s) of the instrument(s) that they wish to study.

For contact information, contact us.

Audition Dates

Students who schedule auditions according to the audition schedule will have the advantage of taking the theory placement test and receiving their results early, guaranteeing appropriate placement prior to registration (see below). Furthermore, students who audition either one or two semesters prior to entering the university and who qualify will have the added advantage of early consideration for departmental Music Scholarships. Qualified students who audition late (after March for fall semester, after October for spring semester) cannot be guaranteed scholarship aid. Priority for aid will go to students who audition early. Qualified students who audition late will be offered scholarships if funds remain.

AUDITION DATES (Dates are tentative)

AY 2021-2022

AY 2022-2023

AY 2023-2024

AY 2024-2025

AY 2025-2026

10.15.2021

10.14.2022

10.20.2023

10.18.2024

10.17.2025

01.21.2022

01.20.2023

01.19.2024

01.24.2025

01.23.2026

03.25.2022

03.24.2023

03.24.2023

03.21.2025

03.27.2026

*The October dates are subject to change for all lower brass instruments. Therefore, all lower brass students who plan to audition in October must contact the Coordinator of Lower Brass to confirm an audition date.

Audition Form

Audition Requirements

VOICE

Applicants must perform two songs or arias from contrasting style periods. One should be in English (from the 20th century) and the other should be in a standard foreign language (Italian, German, or French).  The student is advised to prepare for the audition with the help of a professional coach, as diction, style, technique, intonation, and some sight singing are among the skills that will be assessed. Piano accompaniment is required, and applicants are permitted to bring their own accompanists. If you cannot bring an accompanist, then you must send the piano music to the Coordinator of Vocal Studies at least two weeks in advance of the audition. The applicant must pay a fee of $20 to the accompanist upon arrival, prior to the audition. 

 

PIANO

Technique: major and minor scales and arpeggios in all keys, hands together, one octave apart, typically 4 octaves ascending and descending in sixteenth notes (4 notes per quarter note beat). The applicant may also perform selected exercises from previous exercise books or special exercises assigned by your previous teacher (Czerny or others are acceptable).  

Sight Reading: two unannounced very short pieces.

Repertoire: three contrasting works, performed from memory. Works should represent at least three of the following style periods: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, and/or 20th Century. Examples of types of repertoire are as follows:

Baroque: a Two-part or Three-part Invention or Prelude and Fugue from the Well-tempered Clavier by J. S. Bach or comparable work;

Classical: a movement from a sonata by either Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven, or comparable;

Romantic: an entry-level work by Schubert, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Brahms, Rachmaninoff, etc.

Impressionistic: an entry-level work by Debussy or comparable;  

20th Century: D. Shostakovich, S. Prokofiev, B. Bartok, S. Joplin, G. Gershwin,

S. Coleridge-Taylor, R. N. Dett, W. G. Still, H. Swanson, M. Bonds, E. Lecuona, or comparable.

It is recommended that one of the chosen works be by J. S. Bach.  It is also highly recommended that you prepare for the audition with the help of a professional piano teacher. If more information is needed, contact the Coordinator of Piano Studies.

STRINGS

Violin:  one etude by Kreutzer, Rode, Dancla, or Campagnoli, or one capriccio from Wieniawski; one movement from a Bach solo sonata/partita; one movement from Mozart concertos No, 2 or 3, or the first movement from a standard violin concerto.

Viola: an etude by Rode or Kreutzer; and either one movement of a Bach suite OR one movement of a standard sonata or concerto.

Cello: one etude by Dupont, Piatti, Popper, or an equivalent work; two movements from a Bach Suite; and one movement from a concerto.

String Bass: two contrasting works as follows:  either two etudes or two contrasting movements from a large-scale work (i.e. a concerto or sonata).

Harp: two contrasting standard works from one of the following: an etude (Lariviere, Salzedo, etc.), an orchestral cadenza (Tchaikovsky, Rinsky-Korsakov), a solo of the applicant’s choice.

 

All string applicants are permitted to bring their own accompanists for works that require piano accompaniment. If you cannot bring an accompanist, then you must send the piano music to the Coordinator of Strings at least two weeks in advance of the audition. The applicant must pay a fee of $20 to the accompanist upon arrival, prior to the audition. 

WINDS

All woodwind students must perform:

  1. Major scales and arpeggios. Two major scales from the twelve will be chosen by the audition committee.
  2. The chromatic scale throughout the range of the instrument.
  3. Repertoire: two compositions of contrasting style.
  4. Sight reading.

The repertoire lists below are suggestions but may be substituted with compositions of comparable levels of difficulty and styles.

Flute: Anderson – 24 etudes, op. 3; Sonatas by J. S. Bach, G. F. Handle, P. Hindemith,

F. Poulenc; Chaminade – Concerto; Debussy – Syrinx (solo flute); Faure – Fantasie;

Griffes – Poem; Mozart – Concerto in G Major or D Major; Smith, Hale –  Three Brevities

Oboe: Barrett – 48 Progressive Melodies; Ferling – 48 Etudes; Handel – Sonatas/Concerto in G Minor; Haydn – Concerto; Hindemith Sonata; Mozart – Oboe Quartet/Concerto; Still – Incantation and Dance

Clarinet: Baermann – Complete Method; Baker, David – Sonata; Hailstork, Adolphus – Three Smiles for Tracy; Messaien – Solo de Concours; Mozart – Concerto, K. 622; Rose – 40 Studies/32 Etudes; Stamitz – Concerto No. 3; Stravinsky – Three Pieces for Solo Clarinet; Weber – Concertino

Bassoon: Baker – Sonata for cello and Piano; Kay, Ulysses – Sonata for Bassoon and Piano; Milde – Scale Studies, Op. 24; Mozart – Concerto in B-flat Major, K. 191; Telemann – Sonata in F Minor, TWV 41:f1; Vivaldi – Sonata in E Minor; Weissenborn – 50 Advanced Studies, Op. 8

Saxophone: Bach/Handel Sonatas, transcribed by M. Mule; Berbiguer – 18 Etudes; Creston – Sonata; Glazunov – Concerto; Heiden – Sonata; Ibert – Concertino; Maurice – Tableaux de Provence; Still – Romance; Tillis – Spiritual Fantasy; White – Theme and Variations

 All wind applicants are permitted to bring their own accompanists for works that require piano accompaniment. If you cannot bring an accompanist, then you must send the piano music to the Coordinator of Winds at least two weeks in advance of the audition. The applicant must pay a fee of $20 to the accompanist upon arrival, prior to the audition. 

BRASS

Upper Brass (trumpet): Applicant must prepare two works of contrasting style and two etudes of contrasting style. Etudes: Arban, Brandt, or comparable; Repertoire: concerto or sonata movements or comparable (Artunian, Haydn, etc.). The applicant must also  perform major and minor scales.

Lower Brass: a minimum of six major scales and arpeggios (two octaves when possible), three minor scales and arpeggios, the chromatic scale based on the range of the instrument, two works in contrasting style (either prepared short etudes or segments of solo works), and four short sight reading selections from the Watkins-Farnum Performance Scale Book).

All brass applicants are permitted to bring their own accompanists for works that require piano accompaniment. If you cannot bring an accompanist, then you must send the piano music to the Coordinator of Lower Brass at least two weeks in advance of the audition. Trumpet applicants should send the piano music to Administrative Secretary of the Music Department. The applicant must pay a fee of $20 to the accompanist upon arrival, prior to the audition. 

PERCUSSION

Snare Drum: Applicant must play all basic standard rudiments (26). Applicant must play one snare drum solo (from State Festival repertoire list)

Keyboards – Marimba or Xylophone: Applicant must perform all major and minor scales and arpeggios (2 octaves). Applicant must perform one marimba or xylophone solo of the applicant’s choosing.

Timpani: Applicant must demonstrate basic muffling and tuning techniques. Applicant must perform one solo of the applicant’s choosing (i.e., etudes from Goodman).

Drum Set: Applicant must play time in several tempi and styles, including Jazz, Rock, and Latin. Applicant must improvise (sticks and brushes).

JAZZ STUDIES

In addition to the standard classical audition requirements, Jazz Studies applicants must demonstrate improvisation skills on the chosen instrument and prepare at least one work from the standard jazz repertoire.

For more information, contact the Coordinator of Jazz Studies.

The Clark Atlanta University Band is a multifaceted organization that includes the Mighty Marching Panther Band, the Pep Band, the Symphonic Band, the Essence Dance Team, the CAU Drumline, and the Silver Breeze Flag Corps. Heralded for its precision drills, pageantry, custom arrangements, and intense spirit – all of which thrill audiences the moment the band arrives in the stadium, the Clark Atlanta University Mighty Marching Panther Band has many credits that include its having been featured in the hit 20th Century Fox move Drumline. In this film, students are featured as members of the fictitious Atlanta A & T Band, the fictitious Delta A & M percussion sections, the CAU Band, and also as movie extras. Other film credits include the movie Pay the Price and the video I Highly Recommend, both written and produced by Darryl D. Lassiter.

The Clark Atlanta University Mighty Marching Panther Band members have served as ambassadors for the University in many other capacities. These include their six repeat performances at the Honda Battle of the Bands, Georgia Dome; a national McDonalds commercial; Turner Broadcasting System’s Dinner and a Movie; the Brand Atlanta television commercial with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra; television’s Judge Hatchett show and Ellen DeGeneres show, taped in Los Angeles, California. Other performances include the Atlanta Falcons Championship Parade; the Black Entertainment Television (BET) Hip Hop Awards broadcast and The Monique Show; the 25th Anniversary of Home Depot; the Tom Joyner Morning ShowGood Day Atlanta; the Si-Man Show; the Atlanta Falcons-New York Giants halftime show; numerous parades and drumline exhibitions; HBCU Battlefest at South Carolina State University; Come Flex the Flex Battle of the Bands in Macon, Georgia; Original Battle of the Bands at the Georgia Dome; and Exhibition Band for the Atlanta Public Schools Band Extravaganza, filmed for Channel One News (NBC Universal).

The organization’s other ensembles include the following:

The Pep Band, which performs during selected home basketball games and playoff games. Its members also participate in the Marching and Symphonic Bands;

The Symphonic Band, which is the major performing concert organization in the band program and is, as such, composed of the finest musicians in the band. Students perform at campus concerts and on concert tours;

The Essence Dance Team, which comprises talented women who dance with the Marching and Pep Bands, as well as on their own;

The CAU Drumline, which is composed of talented percussionists. These students have performed at all Atlanta Braves home games as the “Heavy Hitters”, at the Georgia Force Arena Football games, and at other local, civic events; and

The Silver Breeze Flag Corps, which has several talented women who perform with the Marching and Pep Bands utilizing different sized flags, and other props.

The Department of Music at Clark Atlanta University announced the inaugural year of the Music Academy in 2010. This organization is an Honor Society sponsored by the Department of Music, music alumni, and churches in the Greater Atlanta Community. The purpose of the organization is to encourage, mentor and reward music majors and minors for academic scholarship, excellent attendance and performance. Invitation is extended to second semester freshmen and sophomores who are in good academic standing. Students must qualify each semester to continue with the program and may apply through their graduating senior year. Qualified minors should apply, but preference is given music majors.

The Music Academy advocates the highest standard of musical excellence and seeks majors and minors who are talented, disciplined, and aspiring musicians. The academy encourages honorees to pursue careers in music and/or to continue their studies in graduate school in the field of music.  The Music Academy will serve as an extended networking agent for its members who are seeking memberships in music organizations, affiliations, competitions, and other career building efforts.

The academy’s secondary objective is to improve retention, graduation, and success. We want the best for our students at Clark Atlanta University and the Department of Music wants to give students who are talented and worthy a competitive edge for making their goals come true.

APPLICANT QUALIFICATIONS

  • Applicant must be a second semester freshman or sophomore to enter the program.
  • Applicant must have a 3.0 grade point average or above.
  • Applicant must have no failing grades in MUSIC.
  • Applicant must submit a copy of transcript to verify grade point average.
  • Applicant must have a letter of verification from MUSIC TEACHERS from the previous semester of study (contact Music Department office for verification form)
  • Applicants must present an audition piece in Music Seminar.
  • Applicant must submit resume that includes a musical vitae or performance record.
  • Applicant must submit three letters of recommendation: one music professor; one non music professor; and one outside professional person.

Park Street Music and Art Complex

The majority of the Music Department is housed in the Park Street Music and Art Complex, a three story building listed in the National Register of Historic Sites. Prior to 1997, the building was exclusively a church and home to the Park Street United Methodist Church. A special arrangement with the United Methodist Church and a multimillion dollar renovation of the church sanctuary and the expansive educational wing resulted in the Park Street Music and Art Complex, which the Music Department has shared with the Art Department since 1997. The Music Department occupies most of the church’s second floor and all of its third floor. The architecturally stunning facility has a unique character and elegance, creating an environment that is most conducive to performance, creativity, and study. It contains  classrooms, rehearsal rooms for the Philharmonic Society (choir) and Jazz Orchestra, five (5) practice rooms, twelve offices, a percussion lab, multiple storage rooms, a Music Library/Listening Room, a Piano Lab/Music Technology Lab, a Piano Studies Resource Center (containing books, scores, and pedagogical materials), a Fellowship Hall for receptions, and the Park Street Sanctuary.  The Park Street Sanctuary serves as the department’s primary venue for concerts and recitals.  It contains beautiful stained glass windows that provide an aesthetically pleasing setting for concerts and recitals and that augment the building’s overall conservatory-like character.

The Park Street Sanctuary is equipped with a pipe organ and a brand new Steinway D concert grand piano, chosen from the Steinway factory in New York. Knowledgeable piano technicians have ranked this Steinway as one of the finest in metro Atlanta.

The Piano Lab/Music Technology Lab is a novel, technologically current,  multipurpose classroom equipped to serve the needs of many classes, including Music Theory, Music Technology, Sight Singing and Ear Training, Music Composition, Piano Class, Piano Seminar, Piano Repertoire, and Piano Pedagogy courses. It contains a large whiteboard; 11 stations – each containing a digital piano, a computer, keyboard lab headphones, separate interchangeable headphones appropriate for music technology and the requirements of a recording studio; instant internet access and a walled flatscreen monitor supported by mounted audio speakers and teacher controls, enabling the projection of visual images and sound from both computer and the internet; the ability to produce  recordings and compositions, with supporting midi capability, microphones, 16-track recording capability, appropriate software and a separate Macintosh computer station that augments these capabilities; a teacher digital piano that replicates, on a smaller scale, many of the functions of the technology lab and which also contains the keyboard lab controller;  and an acoustic grand piano that supports Piano Seminar and Piano Repertoire courses.

Classroom Equipment

Park Street classrooms are equipped with modern sound systems, internet connectivity, smart boards, white boards, computers (PCs and MACs), and acoustic pianos.

CAU Stadium Instructional Unit

The band program is located in the CAU Stadium.   It contains a rehearsal classroom, office space, and storage space. The location at the CAU Stadium provides the band program with easy access to the football field, which facilitates rehearsals and performances of the CAU Marching Band. The CAU Stadium was prominently featured in Drumline, the popular 20thCentury Fox movie that was filmed on the CAU campus.

Davage Auditorium

Davage Auditorium is located in Haven-Warren Hall, which houses many administrative offices and the English Department. For several decades and prior to its move to the Park Street Music and Art Complex, the Music Department was housed in Haven-Warren Hall. Davage Auditorium is a renovated, multipurpose venue that serves as the site for the on-campus performances of the CAU Jazz Orchestra. Davage Auditorium is also the performance venue for productions of the CAU Theatre Department.

Bishop Cornelius Henderson Student Center Multipurpose Room

The Multipurpose Room of the Bishop Cornelius Henderson Student Center serves as the performance venue for the annual concerts of the CAU Concert Band.

Many opportunities are available for participation in one of our acclaimed ensembles. All music majors and minors are required to participate in ensemble.  Opportunities are also available to the general student population. Membership in the ensembles is by audition, and prospective ensemble members should review the Music Department’s Admissions page for more information about auditions.

Large ensembles include The Philharmonic Society (concert choir), Concert and Marching BandsJazz Orchestra, and The Atlanta University Center-wide Symphony Orchestra.  Concert and Marching Bands have a number of smaller units, and the CAU Jazz Orchestra has CAU Jazztet. Click on the links to the left for information about each of the large ensembles.

Smaller non-credit performing ensembles are organized through the department’s Performance Seminar courses (CMUS114A/B –CMUS 414A/B). 

The Clark Atlanta University Philharmonic Society is a nationally respected choral ensemble that perpetuates a proud century-old tradition of artistic clarity, stylistic authority and brilliant choral tone.  The Philharmonic Society includes an international membership of the finest men and women, boasting honor students and student leaders from across the university. Early choral conductors of the Clark experience included Drs. J. DeKoven Killingsworth and Frederick Douglass Hall, among others.  Since the early 1990s, the Society has established a stellar reputation under the leadership of its former director, Professor Glynn E. Halsey.   It is now poised to build on its rich choral tradition of excellence under the leadership of its current director, Dr. Curtis Everett Powell.

The Society performs the gamut of the choral genre, from major classical literature to popular repertoire.  It has a special affinity for performing works drawn from the vast storehouse of the African-American traditions.  This includes African Folk songs, spirituals, gospel, jazz, and similar works of African-American composers.  It has done special performances in conjunction with such noted figures as Nelson Mandela, Quincy Jones, William Warfield, Roberta Flack, James Moody, Jeffery Osborn, Roy Ayres, and Andrew Young.  There have been command performances for the inauguration of the President of Gammon Theological Seminary (now a part of Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta), and before the National Convening Body of the United Methodist Church, the church with which the university maintains an affiliation. 

During the 1990’s the Philharmonic Society experienced a formidable list of successes.  It appeared with the Louisiana Symphony Orchestra during the 1993-1994 season in a nationally televised performance of African Portraits, an intense, gripping work by Hannibal (formerly known as Hannibal Peterson); it presented five concerts at the world-class Spivey Hall of Clayton State College and University, one which aired on National Public Radio’s “Performance Today;” and it was featured with mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves in a professional CD recording produced by National Public Radio.

More recently, over 4 million viewers saw and heard the Society on “Chasing the Dream: Exploring Black History” on a live CNN web cast.  Along with a number of other select choirs from across the country, the Philharmonic Society was heard in New York City at Carnegie Hall in the world premiere performance of The Nativity, a contemporary work by composer Ernestine Robinson.

The Clark Atlanta University Jazz Orchestra (CAUJO), composed of some twenty young musicians and directed by James H. Patterson, is considered to be one of the finest university jazz organizations in the world.  Numerous jazz greats – Kenny Burrell, Regina Carter, Freddy Cole & Trio, Duke Ellington, John Faddis, Frank Foster, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Farmer, Panama Francis, Lionel Hampton, Jimmy Heath, Illinois Jacquet, Hubert Laws, Chuck Mangione, Branford Marsalis, Ellis Marsalis, Wynton Marsalis, James Moody, Jimmy Owens, Max Roach, Charlie Rouse, Joe Sample, Billy Taylor, Clark Terry, Charles Tolliver, Mary Lou Williams, and Kai Winding, among others – have performed as soloists with the orchestra.  Having appeared as the opening orchestra for Nat Adderly, Cab Calloway, Betty Carter, Ray Charles, Dexter Gordon, Al Jarreau, Billy Taylor, and Sarah Vaughn, the group is also featured in the outstanding film In Search of Improvisation: The Essence of Virtuosity in Jazz with Dizzy Gillespie, Max Roach, Mary Lou Williams, and others.

The CAUJO has performed at the Montreux International Jazz Festival, Montreux, Switzerland, with Dizzy Gillespie; the North Sea Jazz Festival, Den Hague, Holland; the Grand Parade du Jazz Festival, Nice, France; the Umbria Jazz Festival, Perugia, Italy; the Newport/Kool Jazz Festival, New York, NY; the Atlanta Jazz Festival, Atlanta, Georgia; the Fletcher Henderson Jazz Festival, with Lionel Hampton, Cuthbert, Georgia; the World’s Fair, New Orleans, Louisiana; and the Ozone Jazz Festival, Neuchatel, Switzerland.  The jazz orchestra also features a smaller offspring ensemble, the CAU Jazz Quintet, which has performed in Banjul, The Gambia and Dakar, Senegal – both in Africa – and in Barbados, West Indies.  With seven recordings to its credit, the CAUJO has also won gold awards at MusicFest USA, the competition for the nation’s best, hosted by Down Beat magazine.

Atlanta University Center-wide  Symphony Orchestra was formed in 1997 and it is  comprised of students from each of the undergraduate institutions within the Atlanta University Center – Clark Atlanta University, Spelman College and Morehouse College.

The AUC Orchestra emphasizes development of performance skills and study of a variety of styles and periods from the symphony orchestra literature.

The purpose of this symphony orchestra is to provide students with the skills needed to participate in large ensemble playing, to teach correct phrasing, interpretation, ensemble rehearsal technique, and to obtain knowledge and skills sufficient to work as a leader.

For more information visit the AUC Symphony Orchestra’s website:

www.aucsorchestra.com

 

Sherman Irby, Class of 1991, alto saxophone; lead saxophonist for the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra; recording artist; founder of the Black Warrior Records label; jazz quartet leader; performances and collaborations with Wynton Marsalis, Marcus Roberts, Roy Hargrove, among others; leading figure on the New York City music scene; featured in the New York Times, Downbeat Magazine, Jazz Times, All About Jazz, L. A. Jazz Scene, and the Chicago Reader, among others.

“Attending Clark Atlanta University was the best choice I could have made for myself.  Not only did I want to learn how to play jazz, but it was also important for me to receive a well-rounded education.  Unfortunately, I knew I couldn’t get what I needed in my hometown of Tuscaloosa, AL.  When Prof. James Patterson came to my high school, he convinced me that I could get the knowledge and experience that I desired at CAU.  The classes were challenging, and the faculty demanded our best efforts. In addition, Prof. Patterson invited some of history’s greatest jazz musicians to teach and inspire us.  The years I spent at CAU taught me that hard work brings great results.  This was the foundation that I needed to prepare me for the world, and CAU gave me that and much more.”

Ayinde Al-Amin, Class of 2005, trumpet; Assistant Band Director, Mays High School in Atlanta; Choir Director for St. Paul AME Church; Songwriter and Producer for Area Sound Studios.

“The Clark Atlanta University Music Department gave me an amazing academic experience. The vast knowledge that the faculty and staff shared with the students helped prepare me and my classmates for success in the musical field. As a member of the Mighty Marching Panthers, the Philharmonic Society, and the Handbell Ensemble, I was able to showcase my musical skills in class and for audiences across the country. CAU prepared me for my work as an assistant band director for Mays High School, as Choir Director for St. Paul AME Church, and as a song writer and producer for Area Sound Studios. This is by far the best program for students who are serious about their education and musicianship.”
 

Garnetta Penn, Class of 1992, voice; University of Georgia MMEd.2008; Choral Instructor Benjamin E. Mays High School in Atlanta, GA.; Master Music Teacher of Choral Music for Atlanta Public Schools; Georgia Music Educator Association Large Group Performance Evaluation Adjudicator; Georgia Music Educator Association, District 5 Chair; Taught Advanced and Intermediate Chorus, Piano, Music Theory, AP Music Theory, and Musical Theater.

“While a student in the CAU Music Department I was coached, trained, and mentored by faculty who took a personal interest in my growth and development.  The exposure provided by my instructors through master classes, workshops, auditions, concert and recital opportunities provided a real world experience that prepared and equipped me to become a music educator.”

Phillip Davis, Class of 1991, piano; Grammy Award winning producer; pianist/keyboardist, recording artist, and songwriter; owner of PhD Productions, LLC.; collaborated at the national level with many of the major names in the music industry.

“The Clark Atlanta University Music Department had a great influence on me and my musical development. Most of my fondest memories came from the halls of the music department. There was a  nurturing factor at Clark Atlanta that was really helpful to me.  Coupled with very strong and educated teachers, this provided a well rounded education. I learned the bulk of my jazz studies and jazz performance from Prof. Patterson and the CAU Jazz Orchestra and piano performance from Prof. Boozer. Dr. Wyatt, who was the director of the Symphonic band, allowed me to arrange popular songs for the band. All three provided me with a musical foundation that served me well in the profession. Now, with the music department expanding into specialized concentrations (jazz studies, commercial composition, vocal studies, piano studies, church music, etc.), the experience is even more focused on developing great musicians who can compete in today’s music industry – in all genres of music. This includes live performance with major recording artists, composing and producing, film scoring, etc. These opportunities provide a great environment for students to learn, create, and grow as musicians, enabling them to compete in today’s market.”

Lorenzo Callahan, Class of 2001, alto saxophone.

“The Clark Atlanta University Music Department has meant a great deal to me. Not only did it provide me with a great musical education, but the faculty served as mentors to me and other students. The interest that they took in my personal and professional life helped me develop into the person I am today. The music department made it possible for me to attain a college education. Without musical scholarship, I might not have been able to attend college. My experiences at Clark Atlanta University and the music program were paramount to my success and I would not hesitate to recommend CAU to others. “

Ignatius Hines, Class of 1991, alto saxophone:  M. M. in Music Therapy from Florida State University; music therapist for the Clayton County Public School System in Georgia for eighteen years, head of the Music Therapy Program since 2002; extensive work within the Department of Exceptional Students (formally known as the Special Education Department).

“As I reminisce on my experience as a music education major at CAU and the selflessness demonstrated by the professors, each in their own way, I must confess the smile that has formed on my face.  The motherly ways of Dr. Florence Crim Robinson, the tough love of Mr. Mark Boozer, the inadvertent humor of Mr. James Jones, Mr.
Byrd’s “tight-but-right” analyses during rehearsals, and the many, many times Dr. Wyatt and Mr. Patterson, through the leadership of their respective bands and orchestras, made bricks even when there seemed to be no straw.    They were sincere and seriously skilled educators whose generosity gave me the competence and confidence I needed to further my education and find a profession in music that was right for me.  I am thankful for this opportunity to express my gratitude.”

Herbert Andrae Beck, Class of 2002, Saxophone; Band Director R.J. Murray Middle School-St. Johns County Center for the Arts in Florida.

“I consider the musical education I received at Clark Atlanta University to be second to none. I was always challenged by my professors and peers to not only be a better musician but a better professional and a better man. CAU taught me to be a versatile and competent musician and educator. This has served me well in my career as a chorus teacher, band director and Minister of Music. Atlanta is also quickly becoming a premier cultural center for the arts and provides an outstanding backdrop for artistic education. I participated in the Jazz Orchestra, Philharmonic Society, Symphonic and Marching Bands and all served me well. The Clark Atlanta University Music Department is an excellent place to become a musician!”

Chanell Mosley Childers, Class of 2000, Voice; Master of Music Degree, the University of Miami, Florida; Currently Elementary Music Teacher- Dekalb County School System in Georgia.

“The Music Department at Clark Atlanta University prepared me for a successful career in the field of vocal performance as well as music education. Even though I wasn’t an education major, the nurturing environment from the faculty is something that I will always cherish and apply to the next generation that I educate. My educational and performance experience from CAU prepared me to receive a Master of  Music degree from the University of Miami.”

James W. Kirk III, Class of 2004, Piano; M.M. in Choral Conducting from Georgia Southern University; taught chorus at Robert Smalls Middle School in Beaufort S.C.; choir director and department head at Beach Hill High School in Savannah, Georgia; Minster of Music at St. Matthews Episcopal Church. Under the direction of James Kirk the Beach High School chorus obtained many recognitions such as performing for the Georgia Educators Convention, performing live on the WTOC mid morning news broadcast, receiving second place at the Heritage Presidential Inaugural Choral Festival in Washington D.C., receiving a house resolution and invited performance at the Georgia House of Representatives, and performing for the State of Georgia Southern Christian Leadership Convention.

“My experience in the Clark Atlanta University music department was second to none. I received a top-notch education by some of the best and most knowledgeable professors in the state of Georgia. The music department at CAU is truly a family. I was able to contact professors anytime day or night. The greatest aspect of being a student at CAU to me was that the professors saw the talent that I possessed as an individual and then most pushed me to the limit, never taking no for an answer. I remember one night (a Friday night!) I stayed in Prof. Boozer’s office until almost midnight receiving intense coaching on a piece for a major piano performance the following week, because it was not up to his performance standard. He did not seem concerned about my other plans for Friday night and the weekend. It was an exhausting experience, but the performance the following week was a success, resulting in much praise and commendation from audience and professionals alike. It was the time and care that all the professors put into me that has made me the person and musician that I am today. As a result, I now aspire to eventually obtaining a job teaching choral music at the university level.”

Christopher L. Belcher, Class of 1997, Principal Instrument: Euphonium,   

Secondary Instrument: Trombone; M. A. in Education, Central Michigan University, 2005; Charter Member: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Professional Music Fraternity, Inc.;

Band Director at Thomas Heathe Slater Elementary School.

“The Clark Atlanta University Department of Music experience as an undergraduate student was in some respects a cut above the norm with regards to what is considered typical of an undergraduate music degree program. Clark Atlanta University’s Music Department does not encourage static nor sanitized musicianship. It does however nurture the holistic musician. The faculty encouraged and fostered an understanding of the student as well as developing the talents of all students enrolled. I enjoyed the opportunities provided by the world class ensembles in which I performed. Rigor complemented with nurture was a recipe for my personal success and I believe that to be a prescription for any future aspiring professional musician.”

English and Modern Languages
The Department of English & Modern Languages

The Department of Modern Foreign Languages provides students with the opportunity to perfect their language skills for global communication and awareness, understand curricular content and innovations, and international experiences that connect them to the larger world.

Students prepare for careers in teaching, foreign service, international business, consulting, communications and media, law enforcement, interpreting and translating.

Nous aimons enseigner. – Nos encanta enseñar.

“Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.” – Barack Obama

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of English & Modern Languages is to prepare students in English composition and creative writing, various genres of literature, critical analysis, and research to transform and enrich diverse learning intellectually, culturally, and professionally, is to prepare and expose languages majors and non-majors to the languages and cultures of different societies and to achieve functional proficiency and communicative competency in the target language through immersion and varied enrichment experiences.

Vision Statement

The Department of English & Modern Languages will be a collaborative center of innovative teaching, learning, and research that will enhance students’ ability to engage globally in a variety of professions through enhances programs and curricula. WE will also develop a multilingual community of learners, which affords students the opportunity to perfect their language skills for global communication and awareness, understand curricular content and innovations, and international experiences that connect them to the larger world.

Academic Programs

Undergraduate

  • Bachelor of Arts – English; Minor – Creative Writing
  • Bachelor of Arts – French
  • Bachelor of Arts – Spanish

Department of English and Modern Languages
Georgene Bess Montgomery, Ph.D., Professor/Chair, gmontgomery@cau.edu
Haven-Warren Hall, Room 100
404-880-6733

Department of Religion and Philosophy

The Department of Religion and Philosophy acquaints students with a variety of religious traditions and philosophical perspectives by offering courses emphasizing critical, comparative, ethical, historical, and interdisciplinary inquiries. The focus is primarily on the Judeo-Christian tradition, particularly the African-American aspect.

Majors are offered in religion, philosophy, and interdisciplinary studies. The first two areas are suggested for students intending to pursue graduate study in religion or philosophy. Students may design majors in fields such as religion and communications, religion and music, and religion and business administration. Interdepartmental majors in other areas may also be arranged.

Particular courses of study followed by individual majors (15 courses) are determined in consultation with the Department’s faculty and are designed with the major’s interests and objectives in mind. The 15 courses required for an interdepartmental major consist of eight religion and philosophy courses and seven in other disciplines.

Mission

The mission of the Department of Religion and Philosophy is to prepare students with the understanding and the competency to apply major theoretical and practical concepts in the fields of religion and philosophy including perspectives for moral, ethical, and character education while facilitating relationships with United Methodist organizations, campus ministries and alumni, and seeking new knowledge for solving challenges confronting a diverse global community.


Vision

The Department of Religion and Philosophy will be a nationally recognized theoretical, practical, and empirically research-based interdisciplinary character education program, serving to expand the University’s foundational role for religious, spiritual and ethical instruction.

Department of Religion/Philosophy
Philip Dunston, Ph.D., Chair, pdunston@cau.edu
McPheeters-Dennis, Suite 240, Office 246
404-880-6043

Philosophy

 
PHI 105: Critical Thinking – 3 credits 
Development of intellectual skills for all areas of study. Focuses on organization of ideas, identification of common errors in reasoning, and critical analysis of editorials, speeches and articles.

PHI 221: Introduction to Philosophy – 3 credits
Basic issues studied by philosophers. Topics include the nature of freedom, the rational foundations for atheism, human existence and meaning, the nature of knowledge, and issues in aesthetics.

PHI 231: Ethics and Human Values – 3 credits
Detailed analysis of selected moral philosophers. Various approaches to value theory in conjunction with specific contemporary ethical issues are examined.

PHI 241: Philosophy of Religion – 3 credits
Critical examination of selected contemporary and classical issues of religion. Typical topics include proofs for the existence of God, the problem of evil, the nature of religious experience, and the reliability of religious truth claims.

PHI 251: Business Ethics – 3 credits
Consideration of ethical questions in business practices including corporate responsibility, conflict of interest, employee rights, colonialism and imperialism, truth in advertising, environmental protection, preferential hiring, affirmative action, and Marxist versus capitalist views on economic justice.

PHI 254: Media Ethics – 3 credits
Value questions arising in conjunction with mass media. Discussions of the pervasive influence of the media, together with the aims and restrictions that are, or ought to be, imposed on the media. Topics include the nature of various media, value assumptions in news selection and programming, minorities and the media, the influence of television on children, the rights and responsibilities of journalists, and violence and the media.

PHI 262: Science, Technology, and Human Values – 3 credits
Exploration of fundamental value questions and dilemmas associated with training and research in the sciences. Covers applications of science to technology and industry.

PHI 331 and 332: History of Western Philosophy: Africa to Present – 3 credits each
Two-semester survey of the major figures in Western philosophy, beginning with the antecedents to Greek philosophy in Africa. PHI 331 covers the period of origin through Greek and Medieval thought. PHI 332 includes modern and contemporary philosophers. Students may take either course independently or both in sequence.

PHI 353: Representative Problems of Philosophy – 3 credits
Classic philosophical problems explored in more depth than is possible at the introductory level. Students are encouraged to engage in out-of-class research and independent thought.

PHI 362: Social and Political Philosophy – 3 credits
Examination of philosophical assumptions underlying different political systems. Topics include the nature of social existence, freedom, rights, and the individual and society.

PHI 401 and 402: Off-campus Study – 3 credits each
For students who wish to take courses at institutions outside the Atlanta University Center or to study abroad as part of their major program.

PHI 411: Islamic Philosophy – 3 credits
Chief ideas, arguments, and general philosophical concerns of selected thinkers and schools of thought in the Islamic philosophical tradition. Centers on specific historical figures and philosophic and religious traditions, including Islamic mysticism.

PHI 421: Philosophies of the African Continent – 3 credits
Examination of the diversity of African philosophical thought. Intellectual traditions from both north and sub-Saharan Africa are studied.

PHI 431: African-American Philosophy – 3 credits
Introduction of personalities representative of the African American philosophical tradition. Insight into the general character of this tradition and its distinctive style of philosophizing. Also emphasizes issues in social philosophy, ethics, and religion.

PHI 451: Special Topics in Philosophy – 3 credits
Upper-division students explore issues with present-day philosophical significance. Open to majors and non majors.

PHI 482/483: Independent Study – 1-3 credits
Development of analytical and interpretive skills. In consultation with an instructor, upper-division students may select an appropriate subject to explore. Independent study requires extensive reading and written work.

PHI 484 through 487: Paracurricular Study in Philosophy – 3 credits
On-the-job training. Students, with approval from their advisor, may select internships in line with their prospective career choices.
Religion
REL 101: The Biblical Heritage – 3 credits
The literature of the Bible and its influence on the shaping of Western culture. Modern biblical scholarship used to examine selected readings from the Old and New Testaments for their contributions to the understanding of human existence.

REL 103 and 104: African-American Religious Experiences – 3 credits each
Analysis of the origin, development, and social significance of African American religious beliefs and practices from an historical perspective. REL 104 emphasizes the contemporary period, including the latest developments in black liberation theologies. Students may take either course independently or both in sequence.

REL 211: Introduction to Religious Studies – 3 credits
Introduction to the study of religion in a variety of contexts: historical, social, psychological, scientific, philosophical, artistic, and literary. Readings include representative works from the past and the present.

REL 241 and 242: American Religious Tradition – 3 credits each
Historical approach to the American religious tradition as inclusive of cultural and ethnic diversity. REL 241 extends into the late nineteenth century and includes topics such as American Indian tribal religions, the Great Awakening, Wesleyan evangelicalism, religious freedom, slavery and Christianity, and the rise of black churches and movements. REL 242 focuses on the twentieth century, examining media evangelism, the rise of cults, the church and human rights issues, ecumenism and the burgeoning of Eastern religions such as African traditional religions in America. Students may take either course independently or both in sequence.

REL 250: Comparative Religion – 3 credits
Comparative survey of selected religious traditions from the East and West, including traditional African religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

REL 251: Religious Ethics – 3 credits
Examination of major ethical issues confronting contemporary society. Also considers appropriate ethical responses to issues from a religious perspective. Topics include sexual ethics, abortion, racism, sexism, the ethics of war (especially nuclear war), capital punishment, genetic engineering, euthanasia, and professional ethics.

REL 351 and 352: History of Christian Thought – 3 credits each
Development of Christian thought from the early church to the present. REL 351 covers early and Medieval thinkers in Africa and Europe, including late Medieval male and female mystics, and concludes with the Protestant Reformers. REL 352 examines major Christian thinkers of the modern period, including the latest developments in black and feminist theology. Students may take either course independently or both in sequence.

REL 361: Culture and Religion – 3 credits
Study of structure, function, and influence of religion from a cultural perspective. Drawing from recent sociological and anthropological literature, explores the origin, significance, and relation of religion to culture.

REL 362: Psychology of Religion – 3 credits
Examination of the major aspects of religious experience by means of psychological study. Entails critical discussions and analyses of traditional and contemporary psychological theories as these apply to evaluating the impact of religious experiences.

REL 375 and 376: Religion and the Media – 3 credits each
Historical and philosophical interpretation of religion in the media, including religious drama, evangelism, and other art forms. REL 375 focuses on theory, REL 376 on media techniques. Students may take either course independently or both in sequence.

REL 383: Religions of Africa – 3 credits
Study of representative religious traditions of Africa, including African tribal religions and adaptations of non-indigenous ones.

REL 401/402: Off-Campus Study – 3 credits each
For students who wish to take courses at institutions outside of the Atlanta University Center or to study abroad as part of their major program.

REL 435: Contemporary Religious Thought – 3 credits
New developments in Western religious thought, with emphasis on critical examination of representative religious thinkers and movements of the present century. Topics include rethinking of the concept of God; the rise of ethical relativism, pluralism, and secularism; and new forms of theology, such as process, black theology, feminist, and metaphorical theologies.

REL 451: Special Topics in Religion – 3 credits
Upper-division students explore current issues and thinkers in religion and ethics in the context of professional concerns and life situations. Topics such as religion and sexuality, world missions, religious motifs in the arts, liberation theology, and religion and politics are treated. May be repeated for credit under a different topic. Open to majors and non majors.

REL 482/483: Independent Study – 1-3 credits
Development of analytical and interpretive skills. Upper-division students in consultation with an instructor, select an appropriate subject. Independent Study requires extensive reading and written work.

REL 484 through 487: Internship – 1-3 credits
Credit for experience gained through on-the-job training. Students, in consultation with their advisors, may select an internship in line with prospective career choices.

Communication Arts

Department of Mass Media Arts

The Department of Mass Media Arts provides students with rigorous academic and professional training that is complemented by a strong liberal arts education. The department’s curriculum prepares students for careers in mass media as well as entertainment, politics, personnel management, advertising, education, business, public relations, public service, speech arts, social media management, content curation, digital filmmaking, and civil service.

The mission of the Department of Mass Media Arts is to prepare students to become media experts in an academic-based training center through the use of cutting-edge research, new media technologies, 123 computer and digitized laboratories, ongoing on- air radio and television experiences, community organization projects, and the production of print and online publications and film projects.

The vision of the Department of Mass Media Arts is to be recognized as a major source of well- trained graduates capable of communicating and producing innovative mass media art forms and providing creative solutions in the areas of journalism, public relations, radio, television, social media, and film via new cutting-edge new media technologies and the latest software.

The Department of Mass Media Arts constantly reviews trends in media industries and recognizes that students need to be prepared to move forward in the 21st century in their understanding and use of media technology. To accomplish this goal, training laboratories are provided to enhance the students’ abilities in their coursework and to assist in practical, hands-on, interactive experiences. Students are educated and trained to be proficient in research skills, critical thinking and analysis, the use of multimedia and new media technologies, as well as, become talented, creative media experts in their chosen fields of concentration. A Mass Media Arts major requires intensive written and verbal communication leadership skills throughout matriculation.

Department of Mass Media Arts
Robert W. Woodruff Library, Lower Level
Telephone: 404-880-8304
Maria E. Loftin, Staff Assistant II

Theatre and Communication Studies
Mission and Goals

Students majoring in Communication Studies complete a liberal arts program that provides a foundation for them to acquire a general knowledge of theoretical concepts and their application in the fields of public address, rhetoric, organizational communication and communication management. In addition, they will master and demonstrate proficiency in the usage of oral and written communication; and understand the usage of interpersonal communication constructs in various contexts and situations.

The Theatre program provides the student with liberal arts education that leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree. Majors devote a portion of their theatre studies to an examination of the history of theatre, the role of theatre in society, and the relationship of theatre to other disciplines. All areas of theatre acting, movement, technical and literary studies are integral parts of the theatre program. Educated in the use of oral and written communication, theatre majors have an appreciation for the theatre as an art form.

The Department of Theatre and Communication Studies hosts several organizations for majors and non-majors.

Clark Atlanta University Forensics Team 

Clark Atlanta University Players (CAU Players)

CAU Players is composed of majors and nonmajors with a strong desire to perform and produce challenging work. The mission of the CAU Players is to excite, educate, and entertain. The CAU Players present various productions yearly which range from classical works, musical works, children’s productions, and one-act play festivals.

Department of Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 
Eve Graves, Ph.D., Chair, jgraves@cau.edu
The Division of Communication Arts Bldg., Room G-75
404-880-6142
Curriculum 

The curriculum in the Department of Theatre and Communication Studies is designed to educate and train students in the strategies of verbal, nonverbal, and written communication. Both Communication Studies and Theatre majors are provided quality instruction in theoretical and practical concepts to aid in the understanding of the communication process.

Majors in Communication Studies take courses to prepare them for careers in areas such as corporate communication, communication education, government and politics. Theatre Arts majors are prepared for careers in theatrical directing, theatre and film performance, technical theatre production, play and script writing, and theatre management.

Departmental courses prepare all students, regardless of major, for graduate and professional studies as specialists in oral and written communication and provide them with a foundation to manage communications. Students from other programs may elect to minor in either Communication Studies or Theatre.

Degree Requirements

All students in the Department of Theatre and Communication Studies must fulfill the following requirements: Earn a grade of “C’ or better in all major/required and elective Communication Studies and or Theatre courses; and have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better. Students completing a minor in Communication Studies and Theatre should meet with the department chairperson to develop their minor concentration of six courses. 

Communication Studies Core Courses
Students who major in the Communication Studies Department are required to complete the following core courses:

CSTA 200

Oral and Written Presentation Skills

CSTA 201

Voice and Diction

CSTA 211

Communication Theory and Rhetoric

CSTA 301

Rhetoric of Persuasion

CSTA 304

Business and Professional Speech

CSTA 305

Interpersonal Communication

CSTA 306

Speech for Radio/Stage/TV/Film

CSTA 311

African American Communication

CSTA 404

Organizational Communication

CSTA 455

Entertainment Law or CMMA 425 Communication Law

CSTA 482

Directed Study or CSTA 489 Internship

CSTA 490

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts Seminar

CMMA 201

Survey of Media and Society

CMMA 315

Mass Communication Research or approved substitute

CSTA 490

Speech Comm and Theatre Arts Seminar

Theatre Core Courses
Students who major in the Theatre Department are required to complete the following core courses:

CSTA 201

Voice and Diction

CSTA 251

Oral Interpretation

CSTA 252

Theatre Appreciation

CSTA 254

Acting I

CSTA 255

Stagecraft

CSTA 316

Lighting and Design

CSTA 351

Development of Drama I

CSTA 352

Development of Drama II

CSTA 353

Play Production Methods

CSTA 354

Acting II

CSTA 410

Costume Design

CSTA 452

Theatre Arts Management

CSTA 453

Directing: Play and Script Analysis

CSTA 454

Children’s Theater

CSTA 455

Entertainment Law or CMMA 425 Communication Law

CSTA 456

African American Theatre

CSTA 482

Directed Study or CSTA 489 Internship

CSTA 489

Internship

CSTA 490

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts Seminar

Why Study Theatre and Communication Studies (TCS)?

Frequently, students are discouraged from studying the arts because of parental fears about post-graduation employment. However, many forget that “show business” is a billion dollar multifaceted industry.  A study conducted by the organization Americans for the Arts (AFA) analyzed the economic impact of the nonprofit arts organizations in the United States, and discovered $166 billion in economic activity. Nonprofit creative industries annually support 5.7 million full-time jobs.

Why study Theatre?  The study of theatre requires that students explore and analyze the world from multiple perspectives.  Theatre Majors and Minors are equipped with a critical lens that helps them master critical-thinking skills, creative problem-solving, and effective collaborative communication tools.  Students are trained to confidently express themselves, by creating meaning through narrative.

To train effectively within the theatre arts discipline students are required to study a broad knowledge base. TCS students receive a full range of instruction and experience in the theatre arts—practice, history, and theory—along with the full benefits of a liberal arts education.

Our faculty’s expertise includes acting, movement, voice, directing, choreography, stage management, playwriting, storytelling, music theatre, children’s theatre, devised theatre, theatre history and criticism, and costume, set, and light design.

Learning through a synthesis of research and practice, TCS students are trained not only how to analyze and make performance, but how to critique, reshape, and transform the world through performance. We create and examine theatre through three major lenses: performance as an object of analysis, as a lens for social/cultural phenomena, and as a research method. The Theatre Studies artist/scholar is taught to analyze, historicize, and theorize performance.  Graduating TCS majors are challenged to complete a project in the Senior Capstone Course that defines their understanding of performance: in order to deepen and inform a performance.

Why study Communication? 

The Department of Communication Studies explores the social, political, and cultural functions of communication as it occurs in diverse settings ranging from interpersonal interaction to global media. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative methods, the department’s teaching and scholarship explore communication practices, media, and the arts as they shape agreement and dissent, competition and cooperation.

Topics taught in our classes include: new media, public culture, social networking, technology and social behavior, and so forth. They address both perennial problems and emergent phenomena in a context of interdisciplinary collaboration. Students have opportunities for direct involvement in scholarship. Additional programming ensures a rich academic environment for acquiring the understanding and skills that will be expected for leadership in the twenty-first century.

We create opportunities.

Clark Atlanta University has over 120 years of experience creating artistic opportunities. Did you know that Atlanta University was the first HBCU to offer drama courses in the United States?  Atlanta University Alumna Adrienne Elizabeth McNeil, wife of famed businessman Alonzo Herndon, served as the Director of Dramatics at Atlanta University from 1895 until 1900.  Professor McNeil understood the importance of the correlation between human development and the arts.  Clark Atlanta University has continued to serve as leader in the field of humanities education by expanding Professor McNeil’s vision for training students in Theatre and Communication Studies.

The Department of Theatre and Communication Studies expands our students’ possibilities with a comprehensive exploration of the communication arts that includes emerging areas of practice, such as educational outreach, research training, and new work development. Students learn the discipline of Theatre and Communication Studies by professionally interning at critically acclaimed theatres, Speech Pathology Clinics, Public Relations Firms, Talent Agencies, Film Studios, Radio Stations, and so forth.  CAU arts facilities enhances student learning with technologically advanced performance classrooms, and several performance venues throughout the Atlanta University Center. Opportunity extends beyond the campus as well, with community engagement, and international study.

Mentors are always close by.

At Clark Atlanta University, Theatre and Communication Studies majors are never far from an inspirational professional mentor. Theatre and Communication Studies professors are accomplished working professionals, published authors, and dedicated pedagogues with an equal commitment to the development of students’ artistic and social justice growth.  Both programs focus on the theoretical intersection of the arts and cultural identity, politics, sexuality, race, gender, class, and so forth.   With Clark Atlanta University’s focus on holistic education and mentorship as the norm, our students find their voice. Students work with faculty and award winning guest artists, as well as create student-generated projects.

We train Change Agents.

Clark Atlanta University Theatre and Communication Studies graduates play essential roles in their communities—performing and directing on Broadway, transforming classrooms, leading nonprofits and businesses, write for TV and Film, serving as innovators, creative forces and social justice champions. The Department of Theatre and Communication Studies prepares our students for careers in the Communication Arts and helps them cultivate transferrable skills that will serve a range of possible endeavors in life. Recent students have been accepted to respected theatre graduate programs across the nation such as Yale University, Emory University, and abroad. And others have put their theatre education to use in fields such as law, business and education. Others remain in the Atlanta University area and work in the TV and film industry.

Theatre Arts majors are prepared for careers in theatrical directing, theatre and film performance, technical theatre production, play and script writing, and theatre management. The Department of Music trains students to become professionals in music educators, performers, and commercial composers nationally and internationally.

Natural Sciences & Mathemetics

Department of Biological Sciences

The Department of Biological Sciences offers the Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. At the undergraduate level, our objective is to guide students in critical thinking and independent investigation of all areas of biology.

The Department’s overriding goal is to help students appreciate biology as an evolving product of human endeavor. Specialization in several areas is available through the department and its close relationship with other biology departments in the Atlanta University Center (AUC). Course offerings and research experiences are designed for students who desire to major in biology in preparation for graduate or professional study, for careers as professionals, or as biology teachers.

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM

Students may follow a four-year course schedule leading to a B.S. degree in Biology, B.S. in Biological Sciences with Teacher Certification (BioEd Program), or the five-year program leading to the integrated BS/MS degree in Biology.

Undergraduate Academic Catalog 

Curriculum

Students may follow a four-year course schedule leading to a B.S. degree in Biology or the five-year program leading to the integrated BS/MS degree in Biology.

Sample Plan of Study

In addition to the Clark Atlanta University Core Curriculum Requirements, the biology major requires the following biological sciences and cognate courses:

  • Biology 111 & Biology 112, General Biology I & II for Majors.

  • Biology 375, Cell and Molecular Biology.

  • Biology 312, Genetics.

  • Biology 478, Cell Biology Laboratory.

  • Biology 480, Undergraduate Research or Biology 482, Seminar.

  • Biology 491 & Biology 492, Biochemistry I & II or Biology 390, Survey of Biochemistry & and an additional elective at the 400 level.

  • Four Biology Elective Courses.

  • Chemistry 111 & Chemistry 112, General Chemistry I & II.

  • Chemistry 231 & Chemistry 232, Organic Chemistry I & II.

  • Physics 111 & Physics 112, General Physics I & II.

  • Mathematics 105 & 106, Precalculus I & II.

  • Mathematics 111, Calculus I is strongly recommended for those desiring graduate and professional study.

HPAU of Clark Atlanta University (CAU) was established in the Fall of 2017 to advise students enrolled in any major about post-baccalaureate careers in the health professions (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Optometry, Veterinary medicine, and Physician Assistant). HPAU’s goal is to prepare students to become competitive applicants for health professional schools and programs.

The RISE Program offers research assistantships for graduate students who are seeking Ph.D. degrees in Cell, Developmental or Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and organic chemistry. These assistantships include compensation packages of a salary plus the costs of tuition and fees.

Program Overview

The BioEd Program is a collaboration between two award winning CAU Departments – Biological Sciences and Curriculum and Instruction – to offer students an incredible career path. Students will earn a B.S. Degree in Biological Sciences Teacher Certification which is one of the most sought after Professions in Science that is in high demand now and for the future. This program has a two-pronged focus: to address historical inequities in the field of education, and to prepare students to become effective change agents in Biological Sciences who work to inspire and educate  P-12 learners. To function effectively in the contemporary world, students are prepared to use the cultural diversity of their students as an asset.

Mission

The mission of the BioEd Program is to produce effective change agents in Biological Sciences who work to inspire and educate P-12 learners.

Vision

The Departments of Biological Sciences and Curriculum and Instruction will, through the preparation of highly qualified candidates, advance academic achievement of students in Biology in diverse P-12 populations through impactful educational experiences, experiential learning, culturally relevant pedagogy, and the effective use of technology-driven pedagogy in global settings.

BioEd Entrance Criteria

  • Rising Sophomores in Biological Sciences
  • 3.00 GPA
  • Interview with BioEd Team
  • Pass GACE 1PAA OR SAT 1080 Score

Degree Requirements

Summary of discipline and cognate courses

  1. Major courses & teacher certification (required): 64 credit hours
  2. Biology Major courses (required): 33 credit hours
  3. Teacher certification (required): 30 credit hours
  4. Major related courses (cognates): 24 credit hours
  5. General Education Requirements: Minimum 30 credit hours; maximum 36 credit hours
  6. General Education required credit hours: 35
  7. Credit hours of free electives: 0         
  8. Total Credit Hours 122 (Minimum, but due to specialized teacher competency, students may decide to take more than the 122 credit hours generally accepted for the BS; includes First Year Orientation (2 cr.)
  9. Take and pass the GACE Program Admission Assessments and the GACE Content exam

The Bachelor of Science/Master of Science in Neuroscience program is designed to expose undergraduates to the rich world of neuroscience research early in their academic journey. Program participants will enter the program as sophomores or juniors, complete requirements for a bachelor of science degree granted by their undergraduate institution and complete requirements for a master of science degree by Morehouse School of Medicine.

The Georgia Alabama Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (GA AL LSAMP) is an NSF funded program and includes nine academic partner institutions. The goal of the program is to increase the number of underrepresented minority students who complete science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) baccalaureate degree programs and matriculate into programs of graduate study.

For more information contact:
404-880-6790
Location:  3005 D Thomas W. Cole, Jr. Research Center for Science & Technology building
 
Department of Chemistry

Clark Atlanta University’s Department of Chemistry is dedicated to excellence and research in chemical sciences. Chemistry drives all life processes and is the foundation of modern technology. The department provides students with a rigorous course of study in the physical and chemical sciences.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Chemistry is to provide students a rigorous course of study in the physical and chemical sciences by utilizing multi-faceted learning experiences, guided inquiry laboratory, and scientific research to prepare students for careers as chemists or professionals in research and development, scientific discovery, or medical service in the global community.

Vision Statement

The Department of Chemistry will aspire to become a leading provider of interdisciplinary approaches to chemistry education and research that attracts and prepares diverse students to be scientifically literate and competitive professionals to meet the future demands of the changing global environment.

Academic Programs

The Department of Chemistry offer programs of study for undergraduates leading to the Bachelors of Science in chemistry. An accelerated program of study also allows students to receive the integrated Bachelors of Science and Masters of Science degrees (BS/MS) in five years of study. The requirements of these programs are outlined below. Students may choose to concentrate in the following areas:

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biological Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Physical Chemistry
  • Polymer Chemistry 
  • Computational Chemistry

The department offers courses to other undergraduate science majors and pre-professional students. Undergraduate majors are encouraged to participate in ongoing research programs.

The Department of Chemistry offers undergraduate students of superior ability entrance to the 5-Year B.S./M.S. Program. Students may be chosen based on their academic achievement in secondary school. Students must have a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.25 and a minimum composite Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) score of 900 or a minimum ACT score of 22.

Students must satisfy all University general education requirements for undergraduates, the requisite major and cognate courses for the bachelor’s degree and at least twenty-four (24) semester hours of graduate course work in the major field. Students undertake advanced course work and research during their fourth year of enrollment. Summer research opportunities are provided and may be required, depending on the nature of the students’ research project.

Academic progress is monitored throughout. Students must maintain a cumulative “B” or better average. After successful completion of the third year, students must be admitted to the graduate program. Graduate admissions will depend upon the recommendation of the department chairperson and approval of the School Dean.

During the fourth year, students may begin graduate course work while completing undergraduate degree requirements. Students are engaged in graduate study exclusively during the fifth year, at which time students satisfy the graduate residence requirement.

In order to receive the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry, students must complete at least fifty-four (54) semester hours of course work in Chemistry, at least twenty- four (24) of these at the graduate level. Students must complete an acceptable thesis. Students must apply for candidacy for each degree at the times specified in the university catalogues. Upon completion of the prescribed course of study, students receive two degrees, the Bachelor of Science and the Master of Science.

At any point during the students’ participation in this program, they may elect or be required, because of academic performance, to pursue the traditional four-year bachelor’s degree program. In such cases the bachelor’s degree will be awarded once the undergraduate degree requirements are satisfied.

Listed below is the sequenced curriculum designed to facilitate the acquisition of skills and knowledge required for this program.

Department of Chemistry course offerings are designed for students who desire to major in chemistry in preparation for graduate study or work in the chemical professions, for students who desire a teaching certificate in chemistry, and for students in biology, physics, mathematics, engineering and the health sciences. The Department also provides the requisite pre-professional courses for careers in medicine, dentistry, nursing, medical technology, pharmacy, and engineering.

Curriculum
Students may follow a four-year course schedule leading to a B.S. in Chemistry or the five-year program leading to the integrated BS/MS degree in chemistry.
 
Sample Plan of Study
The following outlines a proposed sequence of courses for the Bachelor of Science chemistry. This sequence is suggested, not mandatory.

FRESHMAN YEAR
First Semester: 18 hours
CCHE 111 General Chemistry (4)
CBIO 111 General Biology I (4)
CGED 100 First Year Seminar I (1)
CENG 105 English Composition I (3)
CMAT 111 Calculus I (4)
CHIS 201 U.S., Africa and the World I (3)

Second Semester: 18 hours
CCCHE 112 General Chemistry (4)
CBIO 112 General Biology II (4)
CGED 101 First Year Seminar (1)
CENG 106 English Composition II (3)
CPSY 211 General Psychology (3)
CMAT 112 Calculus II (4)


SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester: 18 hours
CCHE 231 Organic Chemistry (4)
CCHE 212 Analytical Chemistry I (4)
CMAT 211 Calculus III (4)
CENG 201/2 World Literature I or II (3)
CHIS 202 U.S., Africa and the World II (3)

Second Semester: 18 hours
CCHE 232 Organic Chemistry II (4)
CHUM Humanities Requirements (3)
CMAT 212 Differential Equations I (3)
CSOC 105 Culture and Society (3)
CCIS 105 Programming Principle (3)


JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester: 15 hours
CCHE 341 Physical Chemistry (4)
CCHE 380 Chemistry Seminar (0)
CSTA 101 Fundamentals of Speech (3)
CMFL 201 Foreign Language (3)
CPHY 111 General and Modern Physics (4)

Second Semester: 17 hours
CCHE 342 Physical Chemistry (4)
CCHE 381 Chemistry Seminar (1)
CMFL 202 Foreign Language (3)
CPHY 112 General and Modern Physics (4)
CPHI or CREL Philosophy/Religion Requirement (3)


SENIOR YEAR
First Semester: 12 hours
CCHE 441 Physical Chemistry (4)
CCHE 480 Senior Chemistry Seminar (0)
CCHE 431 Advanced Organic Chemistry (4)
CCHE 443 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4)
CCHE 480 Special Topics in Chemistry

Second Semester: 12 hours
CCHE 412 Instrumental Analysis (4)
CCHE 432 Advanced Organic Chemistry (4)
CCHE 481 Senior Chemistry Seminar (1)
Elective (4)

Accelerated B.S./M.S. Degree Program
The Department of Chemistry offers undergraduate students of superior ability entrance to the 5-Year B.S./M.S. Program. Students may be chosen based on their academic achievement in secondary school. Students must have a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.25 and a minimum composite Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) score of 900 or a minimum ACT score of 22.

Students must satisfy all University general education requirements for undergraduates, the requisite major and cognate courses for the bachelor’s degree and at least twenty-four (24) semester hours of graduate course work in the major field. Students undertake advanced course work and research during their fourth year of enrollment. Summer research opportunities are provided and may be required, depending on the nature of the students’ research project.

Academic progress is monitored throughout. Students must maintain a cumulative “B” or better average. After successful completion of the third year, students must be admitted to the graduate program. Graduate admissions will depend upon the recommendation of the department chairperson and approval of the School Dean.

During the fourth year, students may begin graduate course work while completing undergraduate degree requirements. Students are engaged in graduate study exclusively during the fifth year, at which time students satisfy the graduate residence requirement.

In order to receive the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry, students must complete at least fifty-four (54) semester hours of course work in Chemistry, at least twenty-four (24) of these at the graduate level. Students must complete an acceptable thesis. Students must apply for candidacy for each degree at the times specified in the university catalogues. Upon completion of the prescribed course of study, students receive two degrees, the Bachelor of Science and the Master of Science.

At any point during the students’ participation in this program, they may elect or be required, because of academic performance, to pursue the traditional four-year bachelor’s degree program. In such cases the bachelor’s degree will be awarded once the undergraduate degree requirements are satisfied.

Listed below is the sequenced curriculum designed to facilitate the acquisition of skills and knowledge required for this program.

5-YEAR BS/MS PROGRAM IN CHEMISTRY
First Semester: 17 hours
CCHE 111 General Chemistry (4)
BIO 111 General Biology (4)
CMAT 111 Calculus I (4)
ENG-C 105 English Composition I (3)
GED-C 100 First Year Seminar I (1)
PED-C 101/2 Physical Education Requirement (1)

Second Semester: 16 hours
CCHE 112 General Chemistry (4)
BIO 112 General Biology (4)
CMAT 112 Calculus II (4)
GED-C 101 First Year Seminar II (1)
ENG-C 106 English Composition II (3)


SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester: 18 hours
CCHE 231 Organic Chemistry I (4)
CMAT 211 Calculus III (4)
CPHY 121 General Physics (4)
ENG-C 201/2 World Literature I or II (3)
HIS-C 201 U.S., Africa and the World I (3)

Second Semester: 17 hours
CCHE 232 Organic Chemistry II (4)
CMAT 212 Differential Equations (3)
CPHY 122 General Physics (4)
LIB-C 101 Information Technology and Computer Application (3)
HIS-C 202 U.S., Africa and the World II (3)


JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester: 17 hours
CCHE 211 Analytical Chemistry (4)
CCHE 341 Physical Chemistry (4)
GER 201 German (3)
PHI/REL-C Philosophy/Religion Requirement (3)
CCHE Chemistry Seminar (0)
SOC-C 101 Culture and Society (3)

Second Semester: 17 hours
CCHE 342 Physical Chemistry (4)
GER 202 German (3)
STA-C 101 Fundamentals of Speech (3)
CIS 205 Structured Programming (3)
CCHE Chemistry Seminar
SOC-C 101 Culture and Society (3)

SENIOR YEAR
First Semester: 15 hours
CCHE 421 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)
CCHE 421L Inorganic Chemistry Lab (2)
CCHE 441 Mathematical Method in Chemistry (3)
CCHE Research in Chemistry Area (3)
CCHE 481 Chemistry Seminar (1)
CCHE Advanced Course or Core Course (3)

Second Semester: 16 hours
CCHE 412,412L Instrumentation with Lab (4)
CCHE Chemistry Core Course or Advanced Course (3)
PSY-C 211 General Psychology (3)
CCHE Research in Chemistry Area (3)
HUM-C Humanities Requirement (3)
SUMMER SENIOR YEAR
CCHE Research in Chemistry Area (3-6)


FIFTH YEAR
First Semester: 9 hours
CCHE Core Course/CCHE Area Course (3)
CCHE Core Course/CCHE Area Course (3)
CCHE Research in Chemistry Area (3)

Second Semester: 9 hours
CCHE Core Course/CCHE Area Course (3)
CCHE Core Course/CCHE Area Course (3)
CCHE Core Course/CCHE Area Course (3)

TOTAL HOURS SUMMER AND FIFTH YEAR 21-24
See Graduate Catalog for B.S./M.S. graduate course descriptions.


ADVANCED COURSE OFFERINGS
CCHEM 451 Biochemistry (3)
CCHEM 432 Organic Structure Determination (3)
CCHEM 431 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)
CCHEM 441 Mathematical Methods in Chemistry (3)

CHEMISTRY CORE COURSES
Physical Chemistry
CCHEM 541 Thermodynamics (3)
CCHEM 542 Quantum Mechanics (3)

Analytical Chemistry
CCHEM 412 Instrumentation (3)

Biochemistry
CCHEM 551 Biochemistry
CCHEM 552 Biochemistry

Industrial Chemistry
CCHEM 531 Topics in Industrial Chemistry (3)
CCHEM 562 Scale-Up for Chemists (3)

Organic Chemistry
CCHEM 531 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry (3)
CCHEM 532 Organic Synthesis (3)

Inorganic Chemistry
CCHEM 522 Physical Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Polymer Chemistry
CCHEM 571 Introduction to Polymer Chemistry (3)
CCHEM 572 Techniques in Polymer Chemistry (3)
CCHEM 573 Physical Polymer Science (3)
  • Bruker 500 MHz NMR (solution and solid)
  • Bruker 400 MHz NMR
  • Jasco V770 UV-vis NIR Spectrometer
  • Photon Technology International Florescence Spectrometer
  • Perkin Elmer Spectrum FT-IR Spectrometers
  • Perkin Elmer Nexion ICP-MS
  • Agilent GC 8890 with FID and ECD detectors
  • Agilent GC/MS 5893/6970 GC/MS
  • Agilent GC/MS 7820 GC with 5977B MSD
  • Agilent 6545B LC/QTOF
  • Agilent and Waters Alliance HPLCs
  • Bruker Dimension FastScan AFM
  • Zeiss EVO 10 Scanning Electron Microscope
  • Jeol 200 kV Transmission Electron Microscope
  • Malvern-Panalytical Empyrean 2 XRD with SAX/WAXS
  • Rigaku MiniFlex 6G Benchtop X-ray Diffraction System
  • Thermo K- Alpha X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer
  • Jeol 2100 Transmission Electron Microscope 200kV
  • Thermal Analysis:

        TA DSC Q2000 TA
        TGA Q50
        Perkin Elmer DSC 6000
        Perkin Elmer DSC 6000
        NETZSXCH DMA 242E Artemis

  • Malvern Panlytical Viscotek SEC System for Gel Permeation Chromatograph
  • Micromeritics ASAP 2020 Accelerated Surface Area and Porosimetry System
  • Computational Chemistry Cluster: The cluster has 1 head node with 15 TB usable disk space, 1 login VM node with 8 cores and HPE Intel Xeon Processor and 32 GB memory, and 3 dual socket compute nodes with 20 cores inside each, for a total of 60 cores. The CPU in each compute node is an Intel(R) Xeon(R) Gold 5115 CPU @ 2.40GHz. The cluster has a total of 192GB RAM and 10GB ethernet network. The University maintains this cluster. The HPC cluster is equipped with software for modelling materials and dealing with real chemical problems. The software currently installed on the cluster includes Gaussian, Q-Chem, Schrödinger, and Amsterdam Modeling Suite.

The Georgia-Alabama Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (GA-AL LSAMP) program is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The overarching goal of the program is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities receiving baccalaureate degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and who continue to pursue graduate degrees in STEM.

The Alliance works collaboratively to progressively increase the:
  1. Number of students recruited as STEM majors
  2. Persistence and progression of STEM students
  3. Number of baccalaureate alliance institutions
  4. Number of STEM baccalaureate graduates
  5. Number of STEM graduates who pursue into graduate degrees
The GA-AL LSAMP program is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) award No. HRD 1305041
 
Engineering/Dual Degree

The DDEP is a five-year program that awards a degree from Clark Atlanta University and a degree from any of the participating DDEP institutions. These participating institutions include:

MAJORS at Participating Institutions

Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural & Biological Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Ceramic Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Coastal & Oceanographic Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Science in Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Engineering Physics, Environmental Engineering, Geological Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Material Science & Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Mining Engineering, Microelectronic Engineering, Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering, Nuclear & Radiological Engineering, Petroleum Engineering, Software Engineering

DDEP REQUIREMENTS

Introduction to Engineering
Engineering Graphics
Calculus I, II, III
Differential Equations
Linear Algebra
General Chemistry I, II
Physics I, II, III
Economics
Introduction to Computer Programming (C++ or Java)

FACILITIES 

Many research centers and laboratories serve as the foundation of the research infrastructure of the Department of Engineering. These research centers and laboratories provide excellent opportunities for students to enhance their education through hands-on experience to participate in research for their senior projects. Modern electronic classrooms equipped with fast desktop computers and multimedia presentation facilities are available to students.

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Several merit-based scholarship opportunities are available to students pursuing engineering degrees at Clark Atlanta University. In addition to many research assistantships and fellowships from government organizations such as NASA, the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, and Department of Education, eligible students can apply for various scholarships sponsored by Ford, Dupont, General Electric, Texaco, and other companies. A wide variety of summer internship opportunities also are available. 

Department of Cyber-Physical Systems

The Department of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) prepares students to meet the demands of research and training in the IT industry. Each program is designed to provide formal preparation in core courses and research opportunities. Core courses focus on critical technology areas such as information systems, database technology, high performance computing and network security and information assurance, programming languages, software engineering, human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence.

The department offers three degrees:

  • B.S. (Computer Science and Cybersecurity),

  • M.S. (Computer Science), and

  • B.S./M.S. (Computer Science)


The Department of Cyber-Physical Systems’ academic and research activities are strengthened via major funded initiatives. These projects provide opportunities for student participation in research/design efforts and related laboratory work. The Department is affiliated with research institutions, government research laboratories and lay IT corporations that facilitate student summer internships, job placement and early research experience.

In recent years, the CPS Department has made concerted efforts to establish a competitive research and training base and Ph.D. pipeline by enhancing its computer science academic program, its research faculty, and its infrastructure. Major research initiatives include the establishment of the Army Center of Excellence in Information Science, a DOD-Sponsored Information Security Research and Education Center (ISREC) and a Web-based Interactive Training Lab sponsored by Intel. Under the auspices of these programs, several research projects are being conducted in the areas of computer security, Data Mining, High-performance Computing, and Image Processing. These projects are conducted by faculty members leading teams of graduate and undergraduate students.

The CPS department comprises more than 300 undergraduate and graduate students, 6 full-time faculty, and three staff members. The CPS Department places considerable emphasis on research, and student participation in research activities has been made an integral part of the student training process. 

Department of Cyber-Physical Systems
Roy George, Ph.D., Chair, rgeorge@cau.edu  
Science Research Center, Room 1015
404-880-6951

Undergraduate Degree Programs:

  • Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Computer Science,
  • Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Cybersecurity, and
  • Accelerated B.S./M.S. in Computer Science

The following sections describe these degree programs and show suggested programs of study to fulfill the requirements for graduation. Continuing students are to follow the degree program in effect when they started. The following sections discuss specific Computer Science requirements.

If there are any concerns regarding the program, students must refer to their academic advisors for guidance. The program of study form must be reviewed and signed by the student and the advisor each semester prior to the student’s registering for the following semester. A copy of this form is kept in the student’s departmental file. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science

Table 1 shows the four-year program of study leading to the B.S. degree in Computer Science. A CIS requirement is an appropriate research/design project course from the sequence of CIS 492-495, leading to an acceptable technical report and a comprehensive examination on its contents.

Bachelor of Science Degree in Cybersecurity

Table 2 shows the four-year program of study leading to the B.S. degree in Cybersecurity. A CIS requirement is an appropriate research/design project course from the sequence of CIS 492-495, leading to an acceptable technical report and a comprehensive examination on its contents.

Accelerated B.S./M.S. Degree in Computer Science

The Department of Cyber-Physcial Systems offers the opportunity for beginning undergraduate students with superior records to enter the Five-Year B.S./M.S. Degree Program. Students may be chosen for this program based on their academic achievement in secondary school. To be eligible for selection, beginning undergraduate students must have a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.25 and a minimum composite Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) score of 1000 or a minimum ACT score of 24. Participants are selected for this program from eligible applicants through a screening process conducted by the departmental faculty.

Students must satisfy all University general education requirements for undergraduates, the requisite major and cognate courses for the bachelor’s degree and at least twenty-four (24) semester hours of graduate course work in the major field. Students pursue advanced course work and research during their fourth year of enrollment. Summer research opportunities are provided and may be required depending on the type of the student’s research project.

Academic progress is monitored continuously. Students must maintain a cumulative B or better average. After successful completion of the third year, students must be admitted to the graduate program. Graduate admission may be provided upon the recommendation of the departmental chairperson and approval of the School Dean.

During the fourth year, students may begin graduate course work while completing undergraduate degree requirements. The maximum credit hour load for undergraduate study shall remain through the fourth year of study. Students are engaged in graduate study exclusively during the fifth year at which time the maximum credit hour load for graduate study shall apply. During the fifth year students satisfy the graduate residence requirement.

In order to receive the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Computer Science, students must complete at least fifty-four (54) semester hours of course work in the major. At least (24) of these must be at the graduate level. Students must complete an acceptable thesis and apply for candidacy for each degree at the times specified in the University catalogues. Upon completion of the above course of study, students will receive two degrees—the Bachelor of Science and the Master of Science.

At any point during the students’ participation in this program, they may elect or be required, owing to academic performance, to opt for the traditional four-year bachelor’s degree program. In such cases, the bachelor’s degree may be awarded once the undergraduate degree requirements are satisfied.

Mathematical Sciences

The Department of Mathematical Sciences at Clark Atlanta University provides first-hand experience in solving significant mathematical problems.  Students learn the fundamentals of pure and applied mathematics, in preparation for careers in mathematics, natural sciences, computer science, social sciences, business and more.

Mission Statement

The Department of Mathematical Sciences has as its central mission unlocking the door to mathematical excellence and fulfillment for all students.

The major function of the department is providing mathematics instruction to all students in the University and in sufficient quantity, so that they can perform knowledgeably and intelligently in their chosen areas/fields of study, and to pursue higher studies. In addition, the Department prepares its own majors for the world of work and to pursue higher studies.

Scholarships

J.J. Dennis Endowed Scholarship

The department awards the J. J. Dennis Endowed Scholarship to qualified, distinguished junior and senior mathematics majors. The Department also awards a mathematical science department scholarship. Scholarship recipients must maintain grade point averages of at least 3.0 overall and 3.25 in mathematics courses. Applicants for graduate study at the first-year graduate level should have a background in mathematics that includes a course in an introduction to modern algebra, at least one course in introductory real analysis beyond calculus, and at least one in introductory complex analysis. Students without such background may be admitted, but they are required to take appropriate courses to address deficiencies. The J.J. Dennis Foundation awards the J.J. Dennis Endowed Scholarship.  It is the University’s largest Foundation.  J.J. Dennis was a Department Chair at Clark College for 25 years.

Department of Mathematical Sciences
Sandra Rucker, Ph.D.
Chair
srucker@cau.edu  
McPheeters-Dennis, Room 141
404-880-8431

Preamble

We, the Clark Atlanta University Mathematical Society (CAUMS), dedicated to the mathematical advancement of our peers, do hereby adopt this constitution as the governing document of the Clark Atlanta University Mathematical Society.

Purpose

The Clark Atlanta University Mathematical Society (CAUMS) is the official student body organization representing the Department of Mathematics at Clark Atlanta University. The purpose of CAUMS is to assist in increasing the interest of pre-collegiate students in mathematics, to promote active research and scholarship of Clark Atlanta University science majors and to improve the overall academic performance of students in mathematics at Clark Atlanta University. The organization accomplishes this by providing scholastic forums, by offering mentoring and tutoring services, and by presenting competitive activities.

Mission Statement

Our objectives are as follows:

–  To expose students to possible career interests and options in the field of mathematics and math-related areas.

–  To increase the number of students involved in math and science-related research.

–  To provide scholastic enrichment services, such as tutoring and mentoring, to students in the community.

–  To have a more proactive and interactive impact on the student body at Clark Atlanta University.

Membership

Membership is open to all Clark Atlanta University students. In particular, all mathematics majors/minors are highly encouraged to become members. Membership is considered official when a prospective member pays his/her dues in the cash amount set by the Treasurer and is financially enrolled as a student at Clark Atlanta University.

Pi Mu Epsilon

Pi Mu Epsilon, Inc. (PME), is the Honorary National Mathematics Society.  It was founded on May 25, 1914, at Syracuse University and currently has over 300 chapters at colleges and universities throughout the United States.  The purpose of PME is the promotion of scholarly activity in mathematics among students in academic institutions.

Physics
Programs of Study

The Department provides instruction and practice leading to the following degrees: Bachelor of Science degree in physics, Bachelor of Science with a dual major in physics and engineering in cooperation with the Department of Engineering, and an accelerated program that awards both a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Science degree in physics in five years. Specific requirements for each of these programs are listed below. Because of a variety of offerings in the field of engineering that may demand varied course requirements, students seeking the dual physics/engineering degrees must be advised by the department at the beginning of their matriculation in order to match their course work to their career goals. 

Curricular flexibility allows students to prepare for careers in biophysics, health physics, atmospheric science, space physics, technology-related careers, and for teaching in science and mathematics. Individual projects provide ample opportunity for the development of initiative and skill, and through proper selection of elective courses, students may direct their training to fit their particular fields of interest.

B.S. Degree Program

Students who wish to receive a Bachelor of Science in physics must fulfill a minimum of 45 hours in physics and cognate courses in mathematics and chemistry. Physics majors must complete the required courses, in addition to the University general education requirements. A minimum of 122 total hours of course work with a grade of “C” or better is required to receive a B.S. degree.

Accelerated B.S./M.S. Degree Program

The Department of Physics offers students with superior records entrance to the five-year B.S./M.S. program. Students may be chosen based, on their academic achievement in secondary school or college. To be eligible for selection, beginning undergraduate students must have a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.25 and a minimum composite Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) score of 900 on reading and math sections, or a minimum ACT score of 22. Participants are selected from eligible applicants through an extensive screening process conducted by departmental faculty.

Students selected to participate must satisfy all University General Education requirements for undergraduates, the requisite major and cognate courses for the bachelor’s degree and at least 30 semester hours of graduate course work in the major field. Students pursue advanced course work and research during their fourth year of enrollment. Summer research opportunities are provided and may be required depending upon the nature of the student’s research project.

Academic progress is monitored continuously. Students must maintain a cumulative “B” or better average. After successful completion of the third year, students are admitted to the graduate program. Graduate admissions are based upon the recommendation of the department chairperson and approval of the school dean.

During the fourth year, students may begin taking graduate course work while completing undergraduate degree requirements. The maximum credit hour load for undergraduate study shall obtain through the fourth year of study. Students will be engaged in graduate study exclusively during the fifth year, at which time the maximum credit hour load for graduate study shall obtain. During the fifth year students must satisfy the graduate residence requirement.

In order to receive the B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics, the student must complete at least 54 semester hours of course work in physics, at least 30 semester hours of which must be at the graduate level. Students must complete an acceptable thesis. Students must apply for candidacy for each degree at the times specified in the University catalogues. Upon completion of the prescribed course of study, a student will receive two degrees, the Bachelor of Science and the Master of Science.

At any point during the student’s participation in this program, he or she may elect or be required, because of academic performance, to pursue the traditional four-year bachelor’s degree program. In such cases, the bachelor’s degree may be awarded once the undergraduate degree requirements are satisfied.

Department of Physics
Dr. Michael Williams, Interim Chair, mdwms@cau.edu  
Mcpheeters-Dennis 110
404-880-8799  
404-880-6902

The Department of Physics at Clark Atlanta University provides students with the ability to pursue research interests in a number of fields under the guidance of individual faculty members. These fields include:

  1. theoretical studies in mathematical physics
  2. computational physics
  3. scattering theory
  4. solid-state theory and experiment

In addition, the department hosts three Research Centers:

The Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems (CTSPS)

This center is directed by Alfred Z. Msezane, Ph.D. Strengths of this center include low-energy scattering theory, solid-state theory, image processing and mathematical physics theory.

The Earth System Science Program (ESSP)

This center is directed by Randal L. N. Mandock, Ph.D. Strengths of this center include experimental atmospheric science, atmospheric turbulence structure in the surface boundary layer, and atmospheric modeling.

Center of Excellence in Microelectronics and Photonics (CEMP)

This center is directed by Michael D. Williams, Ph.D. Strengths of this center are the experimental study of semiconductor surfaces using techniques of Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and other high-vacuum scattering probes.

Social Sciences

Political Science

A minor in Business Analytics and Artificial Intelligence (AI) combines the study of data analysis methods with the principles and applications of AI in a business context. A Business Analytics minor is valuable for students seeking to enhance their analytical and data-driven decision-making skills. It is particularly relevant in today’s data-intensive business environment, where the ability to effectively analyze and interpret data is crucial for success in a wide range of careers.

Core Course Descriptions

 

HSC 105

Data and the African Diaspora (Morehouse College)

3 Credits

The course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming & statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets. Prereq: None

 

CCIS 105

Programming Principles I & Lab

4 Credits

Problem solving using programming technique in Python. Coreq: CIS 105L

 

CBUS 436    

Data Mining and Visualization

3 Credits

Use data to develop insights and predictive capabilities using machine learning, data mining, forecasting and simulation – Preq. CBUS 313 Business Statistics. Faculty Qualifications: Predictive Statistics, Prescriptive Statistics, Knowledge of Data Programming Language. Prereq: CBUS 313

 

CBUS 470

Database Management for Analytics & Artificial Intelligence

3 Credits

This course delves into the critical aspects of database management with a specific focus on how databases are utilized in the realms of data analytics and artificial intelligence. It aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of both the technical and strategic aspects of database management in these advanced fields.  Preq: CBUS 206

 

Elective Course Descriptions

 

CBUS 434

Enterprise Integration Applications

3 Credits

This course is a study of business intelligence (BI) that turns voluminous data into actionable insight, BI greatly increases an organization’s competitiveness. Students will use BI and become experienced users of SAP BI products   Preq: CBUS 317 Enterprise Integration Systems Faculty Qualifications: Knowledge of SAP Business Intelligence Suite, Database Management  

 

CBUS      445

Marketing Research

3 Credit

Student will learn end-to-end perspective of how analytics applies across the customer journey, from awareness through retention. They will gain a foundation of data analytics with specific application to making important decisions about marketing strategy. Prereq: CBUS 335

 

 

 

CBUS 454

Finance Analysis for Decision Making

3 Credits

Exposes students to various forms of financial decision making in a variety of contexts. Students will practice decision-making skills using financial analysis in assessing firm performance, evaluating financial alternatives and in valuation. Students will develop proficiency in financial statement analysis, financial forecasting, and investment and financing decision analysis. Preq: CBUS 341 Financial Management

 

 

 

CBUS 474

Logistics Management

3 credits

Analysis of logistics activities, including integration of transportation, inventory management, warehousing, facility location, customer service, packaging, and materials handling. Students will be exposed to online logistics support systems to better understand the real-time nature of transportation decisions on other business functions. Prerequisite: CBUS 362.

 

 

 

CBUS 472

Quality, Diversity, and Productivity

3 credits

This course is designed in an integrated fashion that fosters an “emerging paradigm” of systems thinking and learning regarding the disciplines of quality, leadership and productivity improvement. It emphasizes the concepts of Total Quality Management (TQM), Six Sigma DMIAC process and its application to modern management and the global marketplace, the new paradigm of customer value, measurement positioning, key stakeholders, product design, and cross-functional organizational systems Prereq: CBUS 313

 

 

 

CBUS 478

Modeling the Supply Chain

3 credits

This course provides students with discussions and examples that integrate qualitative and quantitative thinking about supply chain planning problems and models. A major approach relies heavily on optimization models, which provides frames or templates for such integration. The course attempts to demonstrate that optimization models and methods provide comprehensive systems approaches to integrated business planning, which is the essence of supply chain management. Firms that succeed in such efforts will realize a significant competitive advantage. Prerequisite: CBUS 362.

 

 

 

CECO 309

Introduction to Econometrics

3 Credits

This course is an undergraduate level introduction to econometrics, the social science in which the tools of economic theory, mathematics, and statistical inference are applied to the analysis of economic phenomena. Prereq: ECO 251 and CECO 252

 

 

 

CBUS 494

Special Topics in Data Science

3 Credits

Course will present current topics in Data Science and Analytics. Prereq. CBUS 313

 

 

 

CCIS 106 and 106L

Computer Programming II

4 Credits

A continuation of CIS 105 teaching advanced concepts in computer programming using a modern programming language. Guided laboratory is required. Co-requisite: CCIS 106L. Prerequisite: CCIS 105.

 

 

 

CIS 431

Cybersecurity I

3 Credits

Provides a comprehensive overview of the concepts relevant to information security. Concepts include development of security policy, malicious code, general purpose protection of resources, trusted systems, and cryptography. Prerequisites: CCIS 223 and CCIS 227

 

 

 

CCIS 475

Artificial Intelligence

3 Credits

Introductory study of intelligent problem solving and search algorithms, inference systems, machine intelligence and knowledge organization. Prerequisite: CCIS 223 and CCIS 227.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Psychology

The Department of Psychology provides specialized training for students planning professional careers in psychology, sociology, social work, and special education services. The Department offers a broad array of courses in psychology to provide a strong background for students who are planning careers in business, education, law, medicine, and social work as well as multiple professional careers in the psychology related fields. Students considering graduate studies in psychology should plan their major with the guidance of their assigned department advisor so that elective courses may be tailored to their specific career and educational goals. Students majoring in disciplines other than psychology and find psychology courses relevant to their educational goals are welcome to register for those classes after they have completed the prerequisite courses. Programs of Study 1. Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology (122 Credits) 2. Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology (122 Credits) 3. Minor in Psychology (18 Credits) Program of Study Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology (122 Credits)

As a field of knowledge, Psychology is based on both the biological and social sciences. The Department of Psychology provides specialized training for students planning professional careers in psychology, sociology, social work, and special education services. The BS in Psychology helps prepare students for a career in the medical profession. The department’s aims are to develop in students the abilities to question and think critically, to become independent investigators, and to impart a philosophy of appreciation for a developing and maturing science based on well-grounded experimental evidence.

 BA students considering graduate studies in psychology should plan their major with the guidance of their assigned department advisor so that elective courses may be tailored to their specific career and educational goals. Students with majors other than psychology who find psychology courses relevant to their educational needs are welcome to register for those classes if they have taken the prerequisite courses.

A major in psychology requires a 52-55 range of credit hours in psychology in addition to CPSY 211 (General Psychology) which is a General Education Core Requirement. The following psychology courses must be included to obtain the degree in Psychology:

CPSY 313 Statistics I

CPSY 314 Statistics II

CPSY 315 Social Psychology

CPSY 371/L Experimental Psychology w/Lab

CPSY 377 History/Systems of Psychology

CPSY 385 Abnormal Psychology

CPSY 413 Learning

CPSY 415 Physiological Psychology

CPSY 418 Seminar

CPSY 488 Internship

The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science in Psychology require a total of 122 credit hours. Including General Psychology (PSY 211), there is a mixture of courses in the major, general education core, and an optional minor that can be obtained while matriculating at CAU. The BA would require additional free electives whereas the BS would require specific hours in the STEM field of study.

In addition to regular classroom work, the Internship (PSY 488) course provides an opportunity for students to work in a psychological agency in order to acquire practical experience in psychological work and a better understanding of human relations.

A minor in psychology requires at least six (6) psychology courses. The following courses are required: CPSY 315, CPSY 377, CPSY 385, and CPSY 413. The remaining two courses can be selected by the student.

 

Sociology and Criminal Justice

The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice houses two programs. Four degrees are offered from these programs – two undergraduate degrees (Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice) and two graduate degrees (Master of Arts in Sociology and Master of Arts Criminal Justice).

The Department consists of five full-time faculty members with substantive academic research and field experience. 

In addition to core theoretical foundations in sociology, criminology, and criminal justice, departmental strengths include quantitative methodology and analysis. However, Environmental Justice, Medical Sociology, Law Enforcement and Corrections are the primary areas of faculty research activity and service. Over the years, the faculty have obtained and administered several grants from federal, state and local governments and private organizations.

Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

Anthony T. Adams, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Chair
Office: 404.880.6194

The Criminal Justice Program (Bachelor of Arts) is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of crime and the justice system. “Criminal Justice” refers to law enforcement, processes of the courts and corrections as a system for the administration of city, county, state and federal laws and procedures. The curriculum includes a broad range of study to meet the academic needs of both preprofessional students who plan future careers in the criminal justice field and those currently employed in criminal and juvenile justice systems. The curriculum is designed to give students an understanding of the theoretical knowledge base and extent of empirical data and findings in this field of study.

The central focus is on: the interrelationship of the criminal justice system with other social institutions; crime prevention; the forms (types) of crime and the classification of offenders; policing and crime control; the courts, probation and parole; rehabilitative interventions, counseling programs, and qualitative statistical methods in the measurement and analysis of crime.

Admission Requirements

Candidates seeking admission into Bachelor’s program in Criminal Justice or Sociology must meet the general requirements of the university.  They are:

  • A minimum test score of 900 (critical reading and math only) on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or a minimum score of 19 on the American College Test (ACT).
  • A minimum high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
  • Acceptable letters of recommendation
    • A high school counselor and high school teacher familiar with the student typically supply these.
  • An applicant statement of interest.  (Essay)
    • The essay may be on any topic desired, but must be a minimum of 500 words.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. degree in Sociology or Criminal Justice must meet the general graduation requirements of Clark Atlanta University and of the School of Arts and Sciences. Sociology and Criminal Justice majors must select all courses in consultation with (and the approval of) the University undergraduate coordinator and the undergraduate advisors in the Sociology and Criminal Justice Department. Sociology and Criminal Justice majors must complete 60 semester hours within their selected program. A minor in Sociology and for Criminal Justice requires 18 semester hours.

Core Courses Required of all Sociology and Criminal Justice Majors (24 hours)

  • CPSC 219 American Government and Politics
  • CSCJ 215 Introduction to Sociology
  • CSCJ 216 Introduction to Anthropology
  • CSCJ 218 Social Problems
  • CSCJ 301 Criminology
  • CSCJ 337 Social Statistics I 
  • CSCJ 387 Social Research Methods I 
  • CSCJ 388 Sociological Theory

Core Courses Required of all Criminal Justice Majors (24 hours)

  • CSCJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CSCJ 205 Law Enforcement
  • CSCJ 305 Criminal Investigation
  • CSCJ 401 Corrections
  • CSCJ 403 Judicial Process
  • CSCJ 404 Juvenile Delinquency
  • CSCJ 405 Criminal Law
  • CSCJ 425 Internship I

Criminal Justice Electives (minimum 24 hours)

  • CSCJ 314 Victimology
  • CSCJ 320 Criminal Justice Management
  • CSCJ 338 Social Statistics II
  • CSCJ 389 Soc. Research Methods II
  • CSCJ 400 Comparative Systems in Social and Criminal Justice
  • CSCJ 405 Criminal Law
  • CSCJ 410 Seminar on Organized Crime
  • CSCJ 420 Special Topics I
  • CSCJ 421 Special Topics II
  • CSCJ 426 Internship II

Total 122 hours (required for Sociology and Criminal Justice major)


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (122 hours)

FRESHMAN YEAR

First Semester (16 hours)
CENG 105 English Composition I (3) (Area D)
CSCJ 201 Intro to Criminal Justice (3) (Req)
CMAT 104 Algebra II (3) (Area C)
CSTA 101 Fundamentals of Speech (3) (Area D)
CPSY 211 General Psychology (3) (Area B)
CGED 100 First-Year Seminar I (1)

Second Semester (16 hours)
CENG 106 English Composition II (3) (Area D)
CPHI 105 Critical Thinking (3) (Area A)
Area B: Choose from Area B (3)
CBUS 250 Personal Finance (3) (Area E)
Area A: Choose from Area A (3)
CGED 101 First-Year Seminar II (1)

SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester (15 hours)

CPHY102 Physical Science & Lab (3) (Area C)
Area A: Choose from Area A (3)
CFL 101 Spanish or other Language  (3)
Minor Elective (3)
Minor Elective (3)

Second Semester (15 hours)
Area E: Choose from Area E (3)
CFL 102 Spanish or other Foreign Language (3)
CSCJ 310 Criminology (3) (Req)
Minor Elective (3)
Minor Elective (3)

JUNIOR YEAR 
First Semester (15 hours)
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ 337 Statistics I (3) (Req)
CSCJ 387 Scope and Methods of Research I (3) (Req)
CSCJ Major Elective (3) Any Level

Second Semester (15 hours)
CSCJ 388 Sociological Theory (3) (Req)
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
Minor Elective (3)
Minor Elective (3)

SENIOR YEAR
First Semester (15 hours)
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) Any Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) Any Level

Second Semester (15 hours)
CSCJ 425 Internship in Criminal Justice (3) (Req)
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
Free Elective (3)
Free Elective (3)
Free Elective (3)

Sociology Program

The sociology program (Bachelor of Arts) is concerned with the functions, societal institutions, and social aspects of human behavior and interpersonal relationships. The program offers academic studies and emphasizes social service, career preparation, and community-related activities that reflect the University’s urban environment.

Admission Requirements

Candidates seeking admission into the Bachelor’s program in Criminal Justice or Sociology must meet the general requirements of the university.  

  • A minimum test score of 900 (critical reading and math only) on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or a minimum score of 19 on the American College Test (ACT).
  • A minimum high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
  • Acceptable letters of recommendation
    • A high school counselor and high school teacher familiar with the student typically supply these.
  • An applicant statement of interest.  (Essay)
    • The essay may be on any topic desired, but must be a minimum of 500 words.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. degree in Sociology or Criminal Justice must meet the general graduation requirements of Clark Atlanta University and of the School of Arts and Sciences. Sociology and Criminal Justice majors must select all courses in consultation with (and the approval of) the University undergraduate coordinator and the undergraduate advisors in the Sociology and Criminal Justice Department. Sociology and Criminal Justice majors must complete 60 semester hours within their selected program. A minor in Sociology or Criminal Justice requires 18 semester hours. 


Core Courses Required of all Sociology and Criminal Justice Majors (24 hours)

  • CPSC 219 American Government and Politics
  • CSCJ 215 Introduction to Sociology
    CSCJ 216 Introduction to Anthropology
    CSCJ 218 Social Problems
    CSCJ 301 Criminology
    CSCJ 337 Social Statistics I 
    CSCJ 387 Social Research Methods I 
    CSCJ 388 Sociological Theory


Core Courses Required of all Sociology Majors (27 hours)

  • CECO 250 Principles of Economics (or)
  • CECO 251 Principles of Macro Economics
  • CSCJ 315 Social Psychology
  • CSCJ 338 Social Statistics II
  • CSCJ 352 Marriage and Family
  • CSCJ 389 Soc. Research Methods II
  • CSCJ 420 Special Topics I
  • CSCJ 430 Cultural and Ethnic Relations
  • CSCJ 431 Social Stratification
  • CSCJ 480 Senior Project


Sociology Electives (minimum 21 hours)

  • CSCJ 308 Medical Sociology
  • CSCJ 314 Victimology
  • CSCJ 421 Special Topics II
  • CSCJ 425 Internship I 
  • CSCJ 426 Internship II 
  • CSCJ 432 Gender Roles
  • CSCJ 400 Comparative Systems in Social and Criminal Justice
  • CSCJ 490 Independent Study
  • Total 122 hours (required for Sociology and Criminal Justice major)

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY (122 hours)

FRESHMAN YEAR
First Semester (16 hours) 
CSCJ 215 Intro to Sociology (3) (Req)
CGED 100 First-Year Seminar I (1) 
CENG 105 English Composition I (3) (Area D)
CMAT 104 Algebra II (3) (Area C)
CSTA 101 Fundamentals of Speech (3) (Area D)
CPSY 211 General Psychology (3) (Area B)

Second Semester (16 hours)
CSCJ 218 Social Problems (3) (Req)
CGED 101 First-Year Seminar II (1)
CBUS 250 Personal Finance (3) (Area E)
CENG 106 English Composition II (3) (Area D)
CPHI 105 Critical Thinking (3) (Area A)
Area A: Choose from Area A (3)

SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester (15 hours) 
Area A: Choose from Area A (3)
CPHY 102 Physical Science & Lab (3) (Area C)
Minor Elective (3) 
Minor Elective (3)
CFL 101 Spanish or other Language (3)

Second Semester (15 hours) 
Area E: Choose from Area E (3)
Area B: Choose from Area B (3)
Minor Elective (3)
Minor Elective (3)
CFL 102 Spanish or other Language (3)

JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester (15 hours)

CSCJ 337 Statistics I (3) (Req)
CSCJ 387 Scope and Methods of Research I (3) (Req)
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level

Second Semester (15 hours)
CSCJ 388 Sociological Theory (3) (Req)
Minor Elective (3)
Minor Elective (3)
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level

SENIOR YEAR
First Semester (15 hours) 
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level 
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) Any Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) Any Level
CSCJ Major Elective (3) Any Level

Second Semester (15 hours)
CSCJ Major Elective (3) 300 or 400 Level
CSCJ Senior Thesis or CSCJ 480 Senior Project (3) (Req)
Free Elective (3)
Free Elective (3)
Free Elective (3)

Public Administration

The Public Administration Department was founded in 1975. The Department has held membership in the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs and Administration (NASPAA). The curriculum conforms to the accreditation standards adopted by the NASPAA which expresses the program’s commitment to the field and to public service education as a discipline. NASPAA-accredited programs are leaders in the field of public service education. The NASPAA Standards and accreditation process serve to maintain and enhance the recognition and reputation of graduate public service degrees, globally. The program has evolved from a general Master of Public Administration degree to a curriculum that offers four areas of specialization in:

  • Human Resources Management
  • Internal Administration & Development Management
  • Nonprofit Leadership & Management
  • Public Policy

Department of Public Administration
Henry Elonge, Ph.D., Chairhelonge1@cau.edu
McPheeters-Dennis, Room 280
404-880-6650

Program Highlights

  • New Nonprofit Leadership & Management Specialization
  • Public Administration Alumni Network Re-chartered (CAUAA Affiliate)
  • New Mentoring Program
  • National Forum for Black Public Administrators Executive Leadership Institute Host Site
  • American Society for Public Administration – Georgia Chapter Conference Host
  • Southeastern Conference for Public Administration University Host

Aja Smith, awesome MPA student, was informed she won one of the graduate NFBPA scholarships and will be traveling to the conference in Minneapolis for the scholarship ceremony! 

She has also been hired as the policy analyst intern for a federal agency!
 
Kemryn Lawrence, a stellar Public Administration graduate student,
34th Graduate Vice President and 22-23 White House Scholar received a 5-year full ride PhD scholarship from UCLA STEER Program to any University of California School of her choosing. 
 
The Public Administration Student Association (PASA) earned a financial award from the National Forum for Black Public Administrators (NFBPA) for their assistance hosting a national conference in Atlanta. That funding will support the PASA Annual Banquet to be held on April 15.
 
The Public Administration Department is undergoing an in-depth self-study to be presented to Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA) their accrediting agency. The department has successfully earned reaccreditation many times and is expected to do so again. This is a collaborative effort utilizing the expertise of all CAU executives, OPAR as a data source, faculty, staff and students. The self-study contains a thorough review of program statistics, methodology and modifications to support the best possible education for the students. 

Mission

The Mission of the Master of Public Administration program at Clark Atlanta University is to educate a diverse group of students in core areas of public administration. The program is designed to prepare students for successful careers in leadership and management in the public and non-profit sectors. CAU’s Master of Public Administration program offers students an innovative global education, high-value engagement, and transformative experiences through research and service. The program is grounded in tenets of diversity, ethics, professionalism, and social equity, which are essential foundations for the development of well-credentialed and skilled future public administrators.

Vision 

The Public Administration Department’s vision is to become the leading Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Public Administration program in the United States. It is our hope that students will leverage Clark Atlanta University’s (CAU) rich history and experiences in advocating for diversity, ethics, professionalism, and social equity to make meaningful contributions to national and international public service organizations.

The overall purpose of the Public Administration Department’s Advisory Board is to support the research, instructional, and public service missions of the Public Administration Department as it seeks to enhance its top national ranking and reputation for excellence. More specifically, the Advisory Board provides advice and counsel at the request of the Department in matters relating to the academic and professional development of the department. It will also serve as a potential liaison for the Department’s current students to the professional world and mentor students as they enter the workforce. Finally, the Board generates the human and material resources necessary to attain the goals and objectives of the department. The Advisory Board is comprised of a select group of 8 – 10 members. Individuals are appointed to serve on the Board by invitation only for a three-year term. Advisory Board members represent all sectors: public, private, and non-profit.  Additional Board information is available via the Advisory Board’s website @ http://padadvisoryboard.blogspot.com/.

Dr. Henry Elonge, Department Chair & Associate Professor
Phone: 404-880-6650
Email: helonge1@cau.edu
Ph.D., State University of New York, Albany
Affiliations: National Forum for Black Public Administrators, Southeastern Conference for Public Administration
Faculty Advisor: Model African Union Student Chapter, Phi Gammu Mu International Honor Society, International City/County Management Association Student Chapter
 
Dr. Timothy Rose
Assistant Professor
Ph.D, Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge
MPA, CAU
Phone: 404-880-6881
Email: trose@cau.edu
 
Dr. Oyebade Oyerinde
Associate Professor
Ph.D., Indiana University
M.Sc. in Public Administration, Obafemi Awolowo University, lle-lfe, Nigeria
Phone: 404-880-6164
Email: ooyerinde@cau.edu
Affiliations: American Society of Public Administration, Southeastern Conference for Public Administration

Dr. Teri Platt
Ph.D. Clark Atlanta University
M.A. Clark Atlanta University
Phone: 404-880-8172
Email: tplatt@cau.edu
Affiliations: American Political Science Association, National Conference of Black Political Scientists, American Society for Public Administration
 
Dr. Sabrina Riles
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of Georgia
MPA, University of Georgia
Phone: 404-880-6882
Email: sriles@cau.edu
Affiliations: American Society of Public Administration, Southeastern Conference for Public Administration
Faculty Advisor: Public Administration Student Association

Dr. Sheila Toppin
Associate Professor
D.P.A., Valdosta State University
MPA, Clark Atlanta University
Phone: 404-880-6652
Email: stoppin@cau.edu
Affiliations: American Society of Public Administration, Conference of Minority Public Administrators, Southeastern Conference for Public Administration
Faculty Advisor: Internship Program, Public Administration Alumni Network (CAUAA Affiliate)
 
Ms. Terry Kight, Staff Assistant
Phone: 404-880-6650
Email: Tkight@cau.edu

The application process requires that you complete and return your application to our Graduate Admissions Office according to the instructions. Your application must be accompanied by the application fee and the following documents:

  • Three letters of recommendation are required. These may be emailed directly to GraduateAdmissions@cau.edu. At least two of your references should be former instructors in your major area. We suggest that your name be written in the spaces provided before you submit them to your references.
  • Official transcript (undergraduate/graduate), sent to the Graduate Admissions Office.
  • Admissions deadlines are June 1st for Fall Semester and October 1st for Spring Semester. Applications received after those dates will be considered for the subsequent semester.
  • Admission to the Department requires a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a minimum grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.0 scale.

When selecting applicants for admission, the faculty considers academic background, work experience, and potential for successfully completing the requirements of the degree. We look forward to you joining our program!

Applying as a First Year International Student

We recommend applying through Clark Atlanta University Application or  The Common Application.

In order to process foreign transcripts, you should have your transcript evaluated by World Education Services (WES) or a similar service. If you have not graduated from an English-speaking secondary school you should submit either your preferred English language exam [either TOEFL or IELTS] score in place of the SAT or ACT.  The minimum IELTS score is a 4.5 or a 32 to 34 on the TOEFL. A waiver of the TOEFL requirement will be granted if the applicant has earned a diploma from an institution whose curriculum is taught in English. Before final action on an international student application can be completed, the Office of Admissions must receive the following:

  • Clark Atlanta University Application or Common Application
  • Official high school transcript(s) from each school attended
  • Non-refundable $55 application fee
  • Official TOEFL score or IELTS score [not required for international students studying a curriculum taught in English]

Apply at https://www.cau.edu/apply-to-cau/

QUESTIONS?

Contact the Graduate Admissions Office @ graduateadmissions@cau.edu.

Contact the Graduate Programs Office @ graduateprograms@cau.edu

There are two types of MPA students: In-Service and Pre-Service

In-Service Admission Requirements

Admission to the Master of Public Administration Degree (For In-Service Students) requires the following:

1. An earned Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college.

2. A grade point average of not less than 2.5 on a 4.0 scale at the undergraduate level

3. At least five (5) years of substantive experiences in a Pubic/Non-Profit organization in the areas of management, supervision, or significant technical assistance.

4. Applicants must provide appropriate documentation as evidence of professional experience

Pre-Service Admission Requirements

Admission to the Master of Public Administration Degree (For Pre-Service Students) requires the following:

1. An earned Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college.

2. A grade point average of not less than 2.5 on a 4.0 scale at the undergraduate level

Degree Overview

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree is a professional degree. It is designed to prepare preservice students for position in the public sector, nonprofit organizations, and to improve the managerial capabilities of those individuals already employed in the public service and in nonprofit organizations. The MPA degree prepares individuals for employment in all levels of government. The curriculum is designed to accomplish three objectives:

1. It is designed to enhance the student’s values, knowledge, and skills to act ethically and effectively in the management of public and nonprofit organizations. It includes the knowledge of human resources, budgeting and financial processes, and the acquisition of information, including computer literacy and applications;

2. It is designed to develop skills in the application if quantitative and qualitative techniques of analysis in policy and program formulation, implementation, and evaluation; and

3. The curriculum helps students to develop an understanding of the public policy and organizational environment including the political and legal institutions and processes, economic and social institution processes, and organization and management concepts.

Degree Requirements

The minimum requirements for the Master of Public Administration degree are as follows:

  • Completion of thirty-six (36) semester hours of coursework in Public Administration and other special areas as approved by the department.
  • Completion and oral defense of a Capstone Project (Exit Paper) approved by the Faculty.

Program Snapshot (36 Credit Hours)

  • 8 core courses (24 credit hours)
  • 2 specialization courses (6 credit hours)
  • 1 elective or internship course (3 credit hours)
  • 1 Capstone Project Seminar (3 credit hours)
  • Completion/successful defense of the Exit Paper/Capstone Project

Capstone Project (Exit Paper)

All students are required to complete a Capstone Project related to their specialization. Students conduct research and present their findings in an Exit Paper, which focuses on a problem area or issue identified either during the internship or mentorship. Students with substantive prior experience related to their specialization may select topics within their specialization in consultation with their advisors. The Guide for the Preparation of the Exit Paper is available in the Public Administration Department.

Exit Paper (Capstone) Requirements

All students are required to write an Exit Paper, which focuses on a problem area or issue identified during the internship experience. Students who have the internship waived due to previous work experience may select topics within their specialization in consultation with their advisors. In the latter case they would have to take an additional course to make up for the 3 credits for the waived internship. The Guide for the Preparation of the Exit Paper is available in the Public Administration Department.

Time Limit for Degree Completion

Those students who have not completed all requirements for the degree within the five (5) year period as designated by University Policy for all Master degree programs, may petition the Department for readmission. Readmission forms may be obtained from the Public Administration Department.

Readmission to the Program

The Public Administration faculty will review all petitions for readmission and will advise the petitioner of the action taken on the petition. Those individuals who are readmitted must comply with the following:

  • Enrollment and completion of the requirements in the six (6) courses
  • Preparation and defense of the Exit Paper
  • Completion of all the above requirements within three (3) continuous semesters, not including the summer session that comes in between the regular semesters.

Public Administration Student Association (PASA)

The Public Administration Student Association (PASA) was created within the Public Administration Department at Clark Atlanta University in 1978. Since then, we have been involved in numerous community service activities, which have allowed us to increase our skills in helping those who are less fortunate. PASA provides students with a stimulating educational environment which fosters intellectual, social, and cultural curiosity as a foundation for developing creative alternative solutions to public sector problems, and enhances their professional development through development programs and linkages with public organizations at the federal, state, and local levels.  One of PASA’s goals is to support the education of students in areas of public affairs/ administration and to prepare them for effective public management careers. PASA organizes activities that offer an enabling environment for students to succeed in the program.  Such activities include participation in the annual AIDS Walk Atlanta, Feeding the Homeless, Fall/Spring Cocoons, MLK Day Walk, PASA annual banquet, and mentoring.

 

Advisory Board

The overall mission of the Public Administration Department’s Advisory Board is to support the research, instructional, and public service missions of the Public Administration Department as it seeks to enhance its top national ranking and reputation for excellence. More specifically, the Advisory Board will provide advice and counsel at the request of the Department in matters relating to the academic and professional development of the department. It will also serve as a potential liaison for the Department’s current students to the professional world and mentor students as they enter the workforce. Finally, the Board will help generate the human and material resources necessary to attain the goals and objectives of the department. The Advisory Board is comprised of a select group of 10 – 15 members. Individuals will be appointed to serve on the Board by invitation only for a three-year term. Advisory Board members represent all sectors: public, private, and non-profit.  Meetings are held on CAU’s campus once per semester.

In-Service Program or Persons with Significant Professional Experience

The Public Administration Department provides a modified program for in-service persons or for persons with significant professional service that reduces the required graduate credits for forty-two (36) credits to thirty-six (30) credits.

In-Service Admission Requirements

The application process requires that you complete and return your application to our Graduate Admissions Office according to the instructions. Admission to the Master of Public Administration Degree (For In-Service Students)requires the following: 

  1. An earned Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college;
  2. A grade point average of not less than 2.5 on a 4.0 scale at the undergraduate level;
  3. At least five (5) years of substantive experiences in a Pubic/Non-Profit organization in the areas of management, supervision, or significant technical assistance; and
  4. Applicants must provide appropriate documentation as evidence of professional experience.

In-Service Degree Requirements

The minimum requirements for the Master of Public Administration degree are as follows:

  • Completion of thirty-six (30) semester hours of coursework in Public Administration and other special areas as approved by the department.
  • Completion and oral defense of a Capstone Project (Exit Paper) approved by the Faculty.

In-Service Program Snapshot (30 Credit Hours)

  • 8 core courses (24 credit hours)
  • 1 Specialization course (3 credit hours)
  • 1 Capstone Project Seminar (3 credit hours)

Completion/successful defense of the Exit Paper/Capstone Project

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree is a professional degree. It is designed to prepare preservice students for position in the public sector, nonprofit organizations, and to improve the managerial capabilities of those individuals already employed in the public service and in nonprofit organizations. The MPA degree prepares individuals for employment in all levels of government. The curriculum is designed to accomplish three objectives:

  1. It is designed to enhance the student’s values, knowledge, and skills to act ethically and effectively in the management of public and nonprofit organizations. It includes the knowledge of human resources, budgeting and financial processes, and the acquisition of information, including computer literacy and applications;
  2. It is designed to develop skills in the application if quantitative and qualitative techniques of analysis in policy and program formulation, implementation, and evaluation; and
  3. The curriculum helps students to develop an understanding of the public policy and organizational environment including the political and legal institutions and processes, economic and social institution processes, and organization and management concepts.

There are two types of MPA students: In-Service and Pre-Service

In-Service Admission Requirements
Admission to the Master of Public Administration Degree (For In-Service Students) requires the following:
1. An earned Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college.
2. A grade point average of not less than 2.5 on a 4.0 scale at the undergraduate level
3. At least five (5) years of substantive experiences in a Pubic/Non-Profit organization in the areas of management, supervision, or significant technical assistance.
4. Applicants must provide appropriate documentation as evidence of professional experience

Pre-Service Admission Requirements
Admission to the Master of Public Administration Degree (For Pre-Service Students) requires the following:
1. An earned Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college.
2. A grade point average of not less than 2.5 on a 4.0 scale at the undergraduate level

Capstone Project

All students are required to complete a Capstone Project related to their specialization. Students conduct research and present their findings in an Exit Paper, which focuses on a problem area or issue identified either during the internship or mentorship. Students with substantive prior experience related to their specialization may select topics within their specialization in consultation with their advisors. The Guide for the Preparation of the Capstone Project is available in the Public Administration Department.

Time Limit for Completion of the Degree

Those students who have not completed all requirements for the degree within the five (5) year period as designated by University Policy for all Master degree programs, may petition the Graduate Programs Office for readmission. Readmission forms may be obtained from the Public Administration Department.

Readmission to the Program

The Public Administration faculty will review all petitions for readmission and will advise the petitioner of the action taken on the petition. Those individuals who are readmitted must comply with the following:

  • Enrollment and completion of the requirements in the six (6) courses
  • Preparation and defense of the Exit Paper
  • Completion of all the above requirements within three (3) continuous semesters, not including the summer session that comes in between the regular semesters.
PRE SERVICE    
Masters of Public Administration     
Concentration:  Public Policy      
      
      
First Semester   Credit Hrs
PAD 501:Public Administration: Survey of the Field   3
PAD 502:Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behavior  3
PAD 503:Research Methods & Data Analysis   3
      
Second Semester    
PAD 504:Economics for Public Administrators   3
PAD 505:Formulation of Public Policy   3
PAD 506:Human Resources Management   3
      
Summer: completion of internships/mentorships (mandatory for all students)  
      
Third Semester    
PAD 507:Public Budgeting and Finance   3
PAD 510:Program Design, Implementation and Evaluation  3
PAD 530:Capstone Project Seminar   3
      
Fourth Semester    
PAD 516:Fundamentals of Social Policy   3
PAD 508:Information Management Systems for Public Administrators 3
Elective    3
Total:            36
      
Recommended Electives    
PAD 509:State and Local Government Finance    
PAD 512:Internship    
PAD 514: Public Management    
PAD 518:Strategic Human Resources Planning    
PAD 520: Environmental Sustainability Policy    
PAD 521: Principles of Community and Economic Development   
      
Reminder: Per CAU Graduate Catalog: VI. Time Requirement for Award of Master’s Degrees 
Each student must complete all requirements for the Master’s degree within five (5) 
calendar years from the date of matriculation. Clark Atlanta University will not award 
academic credit for requirements completed after the five-year period.   
PRE SERVICE     
Masters of Public Administration Degree     
Concentration: Human Resources Management      
      
First Semester   Credit Hrs
PAD 501:Public Administration: Survey of the Field   3
PAD 502:Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behavior  3
PAD 503:Research Methods & Data Analysis   3
      
Second Semester    
PAD 504:Economics for Public Administrators   3
PAD 505:Formulation of Public Policy   3
PAD 506:Human Resources Management   3
      
Summer: complete internships/mentorships (mandatory for all students)  
      
Third Semester    
PAD 507:Public Budgeting and Finance   3
PAD 527:Compensation Management    3
PAD 530:Capstone Project Seminar   3
      
Fourth Semester    
PAD 508:Information Management Systems for Public Administrators 3
PAD 518:Strategic Human Resources Planning   3
Elective    3
Total:           36
      
Recommended Electives    
PAD 511:Applied Urban Management    
PAD 512:Internship    
PAD 514: Public Management    
PAD 517:Labor Management    
PAD 519: International Development Administration    
PAD 522: Nonprofit Organization Management    
      
      
Reminder: Per CAU Graduate Catalog: VI. Time Requirement for Award of Master’s Degrees
Each student must complete all requirements for the Master’s degree within five (5) 
calendar years from the date of matriculation. Clark Atlanta University will not award 
academic credit for requirements completed after the five-year period.  
     
Masters of Public Administration    
Concentration: Nonprofit Leadership & Management    
Courses     
     
     
First Semester  Credit Hrs
PAD 501:Public Administration: Survey of the Field  3
PAD 502:Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behavior  3
PAD 503:Research Methods & Data Analysis  3
     
Second Semester   
PAD 504:Economics for Public Administrators  3
PAD 505:Formulation of Public Policy  3
PAD 506:Human Resources Management  3
     
Summer    
Completion of internships and mentorships (mandatory for all students)  
     
Third Semester   
PAD 507:Public Budgeting and Finance  3
PAD 522:Nonprofit Organization Management  3
PAD 530:Capstone Project Seminar  3
     
Fourth Semester   
PAD 508:Information Management Systems for Public Administrators 3
PAD 523:Board Governance and Strategic Leadership  3
Elective   3
     
Total:           36
     
Recommended Electives   
PAD 510: Program Design, Implementation and Evaluation   
PAD 512:Internship   
PAD 521: Principles of Community and Economic Development  
PAD 524: Grant Proposal Writing and Management   
PAD 525: Sustainable Urban Management   
PAD 526: Housing and Community Development Policy   
     
Reminder: Per CAU Graduate Catalog: VI. Time Requirement for Award of Master’s Degrees
Each student must complete all requirements for the Master’s degree within five (5) 
calendar years from the date of matriculation. Clark Atlanta University will not award 
academic credit for requirements completed after the five-year period.  
     
Masters of Public Administration    
Concentration: Nonprofit Leadership & Management    
Courses     
     
     
First Semester  Credit Hrs
PAD 501:Public Administration: Survey of the Field  3
PAD 502:Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behavior  3
PAD 503:Research Methods & Data Analysis  3
     
Second Semester   
PAD 504:Economics for Public Administrators  3
PAD 505:Formulation of Public Policy  3
PAD 506:Human Resources Management  3
     
Summer    
Completion of internships and mentorships (mandatory for all students)  
     
Third Semester   
PAD 507:Public Budgeting and Finance  3
PAD 522:Nonprofit Organization Management  3
PAD 530:Capstone Project Seminar  3
     
Fourth Semester   
PAD 508:Information Management Systems for Public Administrators 3
PAD 523:Board Governance and Strategic Leadership  3
Elective   3
     
Total:           36
     
Recommended Electives   
PAD 510: Program Design, Implementation and Evaluation   
PAD 512:Internship   
PAD 521: Principles of Community and Economic Development  
PAD 524: Grant Proposal Writing and Management   
PAD 525: Sustainable Urban Management   
PAD 526: Housing and Community Development Policy   
     
Reminder: Per CAU Graduate Catalog: VI. Time Requirement for Award of Master’s Degrees
Each student must complete all requirements for the Master’s degree within five (5) 
calendar years from the date of matriculation. Clark Atlanta University will not award 
academic credit for requirements completed after the five-year period.  
PRE SERVICE     
Masters of Public Administration Degree     
Concentration: Human Resources Management      
      
First Semester   Credit Hrs
PAD 501:Public Administration: Survey of the Field   3
PAD 502:Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behavior  3
PAD 503:Research Methods & Data Analysis   3
      
Second Semester    
PAD 504:Economics for Public Administrators   3
PAD 505:Formulation of Public Policy   3
PAD 506:Human Resources Management   3
      
Summer: complete internships/mentorships (mandatory for all students)  
      
Third Semester    
PAD 507:Public Budgeting and Finance   3
PAD 527:Compensation Management    3
PAD 530:Capstone Project Seminar   3
      
Fourth Semester    
PAD 508:Information Management Systems for Public Administrators 3
PAD 518:Strategic Human Resources Planning   3
Elective    3
Total:           36
      
Recommended Electives    
PAD 511:Applied Urban Management    
PAD 512:Internship    
PAD 514: Public Management    
PAD 517:Labor Management    
PAD 519: International Development Administration    
PAD 522: Nonprofit Organization Management    
      
      
Reminder: Per CAU Graduate Catalog: VI. Time Requirement for Award of Master’s Degrees
Each student must complete all requirements for the Master’s degree within five (5) 
calendar years from the date of matriculation. Clark Atlanta University will not award 
academic credit for requirements completed after the five-year period.  
IN SERVICE*   
Masters of Public Administration   
Concentration:  International Administration and Development Management   
    
First Semester   
PAD 501:Public Administration: Survey of the Field 3
PAD 502:Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behavior 3
PAD 503:Research Methods & Data Analysis 3
    
Second Semester  
PAD 504:Economics for Public Administrators 3
PAD 505:Formulation of Public Policy 3
PAD 506:Human Resources Management 3
    
Summer: completion of internships/mentorships (mandatory for all students)  
    
Third Semester   
PAD 507:Public Budgeting and Finance 3
PAD 530:Capstone Project Seminar 3
    
Fourth Semester  
PAD 519:International Development Administration 3
PAD 508:Information Management Systems for Public Administrators 3
    
  TOTAL30
    
Core Courses, CPAD 501-508 may only be taken as CPAD 513 Independent Study when approved by the Department Chair and Advisor.
    
Course Substitutions are allowed when approved by the student’s advisor.  
    
Reminder: Per CAU Graduate Catalog: VI. Time Requirement for Award of Master’s Degrees 
Each student must complete all requirements for the Master’s degree within five (5) 
calendar years from the date of matriculation. Clark Atlanta University will not award 
academic credit for requirements completed after the five-year period.  
IN SERVICE*   
Masters of Public Administration   
Concentration:  Public Policy    
    
First Semester  
PAD 501:Public Administration: Survey of the Field 3
PAD 502:Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behavior 3
PAD 503:Research Methods & Data Analysis 3
    
Second Semester  
PAD 504:Economics for Public Administrators 3
PAD 505:Formulation of Public Policy 3
PAD 506:Human Resources Management 3
    
Summer: completion of internships/mentorships (mandatory for all students)  
    
Third Semester  
PAD 507:Public Budgeting and Finance 3
PAD 530:Capstone Project Seminar 3
    
Fourth Semester  
PAD 516:Fundamentals of Social Policy 3
PAD 508:Information Management Systems for Public Administrators 3
    
  TOTAL30
    
Core Courses, CPAD 501-508 may only be taken as CPAD 513 Independent Study when approved by the Department Chair and Advisor.
    
Course Substitutions are allowed when approved by the student’s advisor.  
    
Reminder: Per CAU Graduate Catalog: VI. Time Requirement for Award of Master’s Degrees 
Each student must complete all requirements for the Master’s degree within five (5)  
calendar years from the date of matriculation. Clark Atlanta University will not award  
academic credit for requirements completed after the five-year period.

CPAD 501: Public Administration: Survey of the Field. 3 Credits
This is the introductory course in public administration designed to provide students with a broad overview of the field of Public Administration, both as an academic discipline and as a profession. It examines the context in which public administration occurs and its relationship to the social and political environment in which it exists. Students will be exposed to the various functions involved in administration of public policy and how to apply practical solutions to the problem faced in its implementation.
 
CPAD 502: Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behaviors. 3 Credits
This course focuses on the structure, process and role of individuals in organizations emphasizing how and why these components have to be coordinated to efficiently and effectively attain organizational goals and objectives. It defines and examines concepts, models, paradigms and theories in the field of organization theory as the basis for understanding internal and external organizational dynamics.
 
CPAD 503: Research Methods and Data Analyses. 3 Credits
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to study and apply both qualitative and quantitative research methods. While focusing on descriptive research, other research designs and various data gathering techniques are examined. This course provides an understanding of quantitative as well as qualitative techniques for analyzing research data on public programs and administrative problems. Explores the relevancy of quantitative and qualitative analysis to problems administrators face in public agencies. Students will learn to make appropriate use of applied research in decision-making and will utilize computer programming in support of statistical analysis.
 
CPAD 504: Economics for Public Administrators. 3 Credits
This course is designed to provide public administrators with the fundamental economic background necessary to understand and implement public policy. Macroeconomic and microeconomic theories are used to develop tools that are useful applications.
 
CPAD 505: Formulation of Public Policy. 3 Credits
This course is designed primarily to acquaint students with the public policy making process in the United States. The goal is to enable students to identify, explain and understand the structure, sources and processes of public policy making, and, to attempt to use models developed by policy analysts and experts to analyze government policies and programs. Particular emphasis will be placed on the socio-economic and political variables that impact upon the policy making processes and on the utility of theoretical knowledge and research in the formulation, implementation and evaluation of public policies in the United States.
 
CPAD 506: Human Resources Management. 3 Credits
The focus of this course is upon developing a full understanding of the nature of the working relationship which exists between management and the worker within a productive environment. This type of environment, one where emphasis is placed on creating a work situation which is mutually beneficial to both parties, is the primary focus of the human resource function in public and private organizations. This course provides an overview of the historical nature of human resources management in the public sector, explores legal and constitutional structures, and develops recommendations for establishing and maintaining constructive relationships between these two competing groups.
 
CPAD 507: Public Budgeting and Finance. 3 Credits
This course includes an overview of the political and legal institutions in the budgetary process. The various contexts of public budgets, including political and economic, are explored. Additionally, students examine the executive and legislative foci on public budgeting. Budgetary analytical processes, operating budgets, capital budgets, and revenue systems are explained to provide students with the ability to plan, develop, and implement budgets in public sector agencies.
 
CPAD 508: Information Management Systems for Public Administrators. 3 Credits
This course provides an understanding of how to manage information as a resource and information technology as an enabler in public and nonprofit organizations. It places a particular emphasis on ways in which information resources and information technology lend support to operational, tactical, and strategic decision making by frontline, mid-level, and top public administrators. No prerequisites for this course.
 
CPAD 509: State and Local Government Finance. 3 Credits
This course covers the many aspects of financial management: the need for accurate forecasting, accounting reporting, the players and pressures of the budget cycle; the importance of local revenue sources; the need for sound management of debt, cash, inventory, purchasing and risk. This course focuses on management principles and practices while outlining the financial and economic context within which financial management takes place.
 
CPAD 510: Program Design Implementation and Evaluation. 3 Credits
This course introduces students to the importance of program design, implementation and evaluation in the field of public administration. It highlights essential steps and issues involved in the design of effective public programs and underscore the need to conduct good evaluation for these programs. In addition, the course examines how social science knowledge can enhance the design and evaluation of public programs.
 
CPAD 511: Applied Urban Management.
The course will expose the students to the complex problems of managing urban America in the 21st century. Specific emphasis will be placed on the political environment of urban places with their diverse populations configured in dimensions of race, class and economic disparities. The overall goal of the course is to have the students gather general knowledge of urban America and acquire skills that may be applied in managing urban units of government.
 
CPAD 512: Internship. 3 Credits
All pre-service students are required to complete an approved internship. The length of the internship must be a minimum of eight (8) weeks and 300 hours of on-site work. The purpose of the internship is to provide students with practical hands on experience related to their areas of concentration. This experience should be in a position which provides students with administrative responsibilities and under the direct supervision of a person in the organization who has mid to executive level responsibility. Discussions also focus on the identification of problems which will be used in the students final Exit Paper.
 
CPAD 513: Independent Study. 3 Credits
This course is provided for students requesting special instruction in an approved concentration. Students are given required reading lists for analysis and discussion with the assigned faculty. Students also complete case study analysis and a major research paper on a topic that has prior approval of the faculty. The student learning outcomes reflect those of the specific course for which the independent study is undertaken, e.g., CPAD 521, Principles of community and Economic Development.
 
CPAD 514: Public Management. 3 Credits
This course is designed to broaden the students’ knowledge of the scope and character of managing in the public sector. In addition to exploring the traditional functions and behavior of public managers, this course will place emphasis on the politics of public management. Issues related to ethical behavior in public management will also be explored. Considerable attention will be given to current approaches to improve the management of public organizations.
 
CPAD 515: Comparative Administration. 3 Credits
Comparative public administration is the systematic study of public administration, policy and management from a cross-national perspective. It introduces students to a wide range of administrative systems with an emphasis on third world public bureaucracies. Selected administrative systems will be used in the study of comparative administration.
 
CPAD 516: Fundamentals of Social Policy. 3 Credits
This course examines the approaches utilized by scholars and practitioners in the field of public administration to study and understand social policies in the United States. Socio-economic, political and ideological context within which these policies are formulated as analyzed to enable students to grasp concepts, analytical frameworks, issues and themes in the social policy area. Together, they will also explore creative solutions to some of these policy dilemmas in today’s American society.
 
CPAD 517: Labor Management Relations. 3 Credits
This is an introductory course designed to enhance the knowledge of students in the area of labor management relations and collective bargaining. The primary objectives of this course are to introduce students to the terminology, historical context and current trends in the area of labor management relations as they relates to both the public and private sectors. Due to the legal environment and political context in which the public sector operates it is important to distinguish the differences between the management of labor relations in the public versus the private sector. Finally, this course will allow students to gain hands on experience in resolving labor management issues by examining relevant case studies and participating in various role play simulations.
 
CPAD 518: Strategic Human Resources Management Planning. 3 Credits
This course gives the student a practical overview of strategic human resources practices as tools for management in today’s knowledge-based organization. The organization’s need to link the accomplishment of its strategic mission to human resource activities is explored. Emphasis is placed on using individual HR functions for achieving an organization’s mission and purpose. Human resources techniques and functions are addressed from the perspective of their ability to provide value-added assistance to achieving goals of the organization.
 
CPAD 519: International Development Administration. 3 Credits
This course is designed to familiarize students with essential concepts, theories and activities involved in the process of administering development in non-western societies. Since the concept of development is a western construct, the course will contrast the western view of development and administration with non-western perspectives of managing the forces of change, with the help of governmental and other structures; it will also highlight the areas of convergence and divergence of these contending forces of development and administration/management in these societies.
 
CPAD 520: Environmental Sustainability Policy. 3 Credits
This course is an interdisciplinary analysis of the issues associated with the concepts of sustainability, environmental management, and policymaking. It explores how sustainability influences real-world practice in environmental management, planning, and policy. Students will learn to analyze and evaluate selected case studies illustrating sustainability thinking as it pertains to critical environmental zones and regions, along with global environmental threats. No prerequisites for this course.
 
CPAD 521: Principles of Community and Economic Development. 3 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to concepts, theories and methods developed in the study of community and development. Citizens’ empowerment, policy formation, and the role of the nonprofit organization will be discussed.
 
PAD 522: Nonprofit Organization Management
This course will explore traditional functions and behavior of nonprofit managers. Considerable attention will be given to current approaches to improve the management of U.S. nonprofit sector organizations. To this end, this course will approach this process through an in-depth analysis of strategic management and leadership processes, including the role of managing financial, paid staff, volunteer, fund development, governance and informational resources.  
 
PAD 523: Board Governance and Strategic Leadership
This course introduces students to strategic leadership issues in the nonprofit sector, focusing on NPO governance (board of directors) and executive leadership roles in strategy formation and implementation. Specifically, it will evaluate strategic and operational management tools necessary to analyze external, competitive, and internal environments.

CPAD 524: Grant Proposal Writing and Management. 3 Credits
This course introduces students to various types of government, private and nonprofit grant funding. Specifically, students will evaluate strategies necessary for seeking grant funds, responding to Request for Proposals (RFPs) and developing grant proposal strategies. The course will also focus on sustainability and grant management approaches to funding and overall strategic planning.  
 
CPAD 525: Sustainable Urban Management. 3 Credits
This course provides an overview of urban management practices to include, regulatory, programmatic and fiscal methods necessary to sustain urban growth. 
 
PAD 526: Housing and Community Development Policy. 3 Credits
This course examines the mechanics of real estate financial markets, including the roles of developers, investors, lenders, tenants, owners, and government. We will address these issues from both a financial and social perspective, including addressing issues of affordability, equity, and sustainability.
 
PAD 527: Compensation Management. 3 credits
This course examines the history, evolution, and contemporary practices of compensation administration and management in the public sector, including pay policy formulation and employee benefits policies.  This course will present broad policy issues, managerial concerns, and methods to improve the effectiveness of compensation practices in the public sector.
 
CPAD 528: Humanitarian and Disaster Management. 3 Credits
This course explores the dynamics of humanitarian and disaster assistance in local, national, and global settings. It focuses specifically on major players and their interactions, along with an examination of the role of local, national, and global politics in assistance efforts.
 
PAD 529: International Energy & Environmental Policy. 3 Credits
This course examines the relationships between energy and environment policy to equip students with knowledge of the physical, environmental, technological, economic and political aspects of energy systems. It also explores the conflict between economic and environmental interests over the expansion and integration of renewable energy as part of the attempt to decarbonize energy systems.
 
PAD 530: Capstone Project Seminar. 3 Credits
This course allows students to apply the knowledge, skills, and competencies gained from core and elective courses in the MPA program to a concentration specific problem or dilemma. Students will be guided through the completion and defense an Internship or Applied Research Capstone Project. This course must be taken at the end of the students’ degree plan. 
 
CPAD 531: Thesis Research. 3 Credits
 
CPAD 532 Thesis Consultation. 1 Credit

Pi Alpha Alpha Honor Society

Pi Alpha Alpha is the Global Honor Society for Public Affairs and Administration. The purpose of Pi Alpha Alpha is to encourage and recognize outstanding scholarship and accomplishment in public affairs and administration. Its objectives, such as fostering integrity, professionalism, and effective performance, promote the advancement of quality in the education and practice of the art and science of public affairs and administration. PAA membership identifies those with the highest performance levels in educational programs preparing them for public service careers. To eligible graduate students must achieve and maintain a 3.7/4.0 GPA and have completed 50% of their public administration, public policy or sub-degree coursework. Pi Alpha Alpha inductions occur during the PASA banquet in April.

Public Administration Student Association (PASA):

The Public Administration Student Association (PASA) was created within the Public Administration Department at Clark Atlanta University in 1978. Since then, we have been involved in numerous community service activities, which have allowed us to increase our skills in helping those who are less fortunate. PASA  provides students with a stimulating educational environment which fosters intellectual, social, and cultural curiosity as a foundation for developing creative alternative solutions to public sector problems, and enhances their professional development through development programs and linkages with public organizations at the federal, state, and local levels.  One of PASA’s goals is to support the education of students in areas of public affairs/ administration and to prepare them for effective public management careers. PASA organizes activities that offer an enabling environment for students to succeed in the program.  Such activities include participation in the annual AIDS Walk Atlanta, Feeding the Homeless, Fall/Spring Cocoons, MLK Day Walk, PASA annual banquet, and mentoring. 

Public Administration Alumni Network Affiliate (PAANA)

The Public Administration Alumni Network Affiliate (PAANA) is an affiliate of Clark Atlanta University’s Alumni Association (CAUAA). The PAANA’s mission is to engage MPA students, advocate for CAU alumni, and invest in the Public Administration Department through the Dr. James T. Jones Scholarship Fund and other contributions. The PAANA will accomplish this mission through the following objectives:

  • To promote, create, maintain, and instill in the alumni a sense of personal commitment to ideals, civic involvement, traditions, and principles of the CAUAA – PAANA, the Public Administration Department and the University;
  • To develop and implement programs that enhances the image of CAUAA – PAANA and supports the missions of the Public Administration Department and the University;
  • To engage current students in the Public Administration Department through internships, mentorship, and activities that support student development throughout matriculation and beyond;
  • To advocate for the Public Administration Department through recruitment of students;
  • To invest financially and seek ongoing support for the Public Administration Department and the University; and
  • To promote a network among alumni of the Public Administration Department to assist one another in professional, economic, and social development.

The PAANA general membership meetings are held three times per year (i.e., April before the PASA banquet, October during homecoming week, and December). All MPA alumni are encouraged to join. Membership and other information is available via the PAANA website @ www.caupaana.org.

 

Pi Gamma Mu Honor Society 

Eligible Social Science students from CAU (undergrad and graduate students) with a GPA of 3.00 or better qualify for membership. Dr. Henry Elonge supervises the CAU Chapter. Membership drives occur each spring semester. 

Membership in a certified, credible honor society like Pi Gamma Mu provides prospective employers with instant verification of exemplary performance and achievement, distinguishing members from competing job applicants at a glance. In fact, the US Government’s Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers incoming federal employees a two level pay grade increase for “Superior Academic Achievement” which can be obtained through membership in Pi Gamma Mu. 

5 YEAR MPA TRENDS
AY 17/18 AY 18/19 AY 19/20 AY 20/21 AY 21/22 AY 22/23
Enrolled 43 36 33 36 42 57
Graduates 17 21 13 13 13 17
EMPLOYED within 6 months
Public Sector 9 5 5 4 4 9
Private Sector 4 8 5 3 1 1
NonProfit 1 1 0 0 4 9
Continued Ed 1 3 2 2 1 2
Other 2 2 1 4 3 0
MPA OUTCOMES
5 YEAR MPA COHORT GRADUATION RATES
100%=4 semesters/2 years 150%=6 semesters/3 years 200%= 8 semesters/4 years
AY 17/18 3 5 5
AY 18/19 1 11 11
AY 19/20 1 6 9
AY 20/21 6 14 14
AY 21/22 7 14 14
AY 22/23 14 17 17
Internship Placement by Sectors
Year Public Sector Nonprofit Sector Private/ Corporate Sector Total
2018 0 0 0 0
2019 3 0 2 5
2020 0 0 2 2
2021 0 1 0 1
2022 0 2 0 2
2023 3 0 1 4
Total 6 3 5 14
Internship Placement by Concentrations
Year HR Int’l Admin & Dev Admin Nonprofit Mgt Public Policy  Total
2019 3 0 0 2 5
2020 1 1 0 0 2
2021 1 0 0 0 1
2022 0 0 1 1 2
2023 1 0 0 3 4
Total 6 1 1 6 14
Mentorship Placement by Sector
Year Public Sector Nonprofit Sector Private/ Corporate Sector Total
2019 4 1 1 6
2020 2 6 3 11
2021 2 4 0 6
2022 7 4 1 12
2023 2 3 0 5
Total 17 18 5 40
Mentorship Placement by Concentration
Year HR Int’l Admin & Dev Admin Nonprofit Mgt Public Policy  Total
2019 2 1 0 3 6
2020 5 1 1 4 11
2021 0 0 4 2 6
2022 4 0 2 6 12
2023 1 0 1 3 5
Total 12 2 8 18 40
Sources: Clark Atlanta University, Public Administration Department’s MPA Cohort Data, 2017 – 2022, and Clark Atlanta University Office of Planning, Assessment, and Institutional Research.